John Kennedy – LA

Current Position: US Senator since 2017
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Secretary of the Louisiana Department of Revenue from 1996 – 2015

Featured Quote: 
Quitting a social media account or web app shouldn’t be hard. My Click to Quit Act would give users a quick and sure way to delete unwanted accounts.

Featured Video: 
‘One Of My Constituents Got This In The Mail’: John Kennedy Presents Surprising Letter At Hearing

WASHINGTON – Sen. John Kennedy today introduced the Seniors Saving on Insulin Act and the Vital Medication Affordability Act to help make insulin and epinephrine more affordable for Louisianians.

“Hundreds of thousands of Louisianians rely on lifesaving medications like insulin and epinephrine, and 12 percent of adults in our state have diabetes. Our people need access to affordable medications, especially when our state is recovering from historic storms. My bills would make insulin more affordable for seniors on Medicare and ensure that key health centers pass along discounts on insulin and epinephrine to patients,” said Kennedy. 

The Seniors Saving on Insulin Act would codify as law the Part D Senior Savings Model, which provides Medicare patients with plans that offer affordable insulin. The bill would ensure that Medicare patients could buy a month’s supply of insulin at no more than $35. One-third of Medicare users have diabetes, and more than 3 million Medicare patients rely on insulin. Research has shown that affordable medications make patients more able to care for their health consistently, which improves health outcomes and lowers health care costs in the long term.

The Vital Medication Affordability Act would require federally qualified health centers (FQHCs), which serve poor, uninsured and rural residents, to pass along their savings on insulin and epinephrine to their patients. FQHCs can purchase prescription drugs at a discount through the 340B Drug Pricing Program. Kennedy’s legislation would make FQHCs offer these discounts on insulin and epinephrine to many patients who otherwise could not afford these medications.

Text of the Seniors Saving on Insulin Act is available here.

Text of the Vital Medication Affordability Act is available here.

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 2017
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Secretary of the Louisiana Department of Revenue from 1996 – 2015

Featured Quote: 
Quitting a social media account or web app shouldn’t be hard. My Click to Quit Act would give users a quick and sure way to delete unwanted accounts.

Featured Video: 
‘One Of My Constituents Got This In The Mail’: John Kennedy Presents Surprising Letter At Hearing

News

WASHINGTON – Sen. John Kennedy today introduced the Seniors Saving on Insulin Act and the Vital Medication Affordability Act to help make insulin and epinephrine more affordable for Louisianians.

“Hundreds of thousands of Louisianians rely on lifesaving medications like insulin and epinephrine, and 12 percent of adults in our state have diabetes. Our people need access to affordable medications, especially when our state is recovering from historic storms. My bills would make insulin more affordable for seniors on Medicare and ensure that key health centers pass along discounts on insulin and epinephrine to patients,” said Kennedy. 

The Seniors Saving on Insulin Act would codify as law the Part D Senior Savings Model, which provides Medicare patients with plans that offer affordable insulin. The bill would ensure that Medicare patients could buy a month’s supply of insulin at no more than $35. One-third of Medicare users have diabetes, and more than 3 million Medicare patients rely on insulin. Research has shown that affordable medications make patients more able to care for their health consistently, which improves health outcomes and lowers health care costs in the long term.

The Vital Medication Affordability Act would require federally qualified health centers (FQHCs), which serve poor, uninsured and rural residents, to pass along their savings on insulin and epinephrine to their patients. FQHCs can purchase prescription drugs at a discount through the 340B Drug Pricing Program. Kennedy’s legislation would make FQHCs offer these discounts on insulin and epinephrine to many patients who otherwise could not afford these medications.

Text of the Seniors Saving on Insulin Act is available here.

Text of the Vital Medication Affordability Act is available here.

Twitter

About

John Kennedy

Source: Government page

Sen. Kennedy served as secretary of the Department of Revenue, special counsel to Gov. Roemer and secretary of Gov. Roemer’s cabinet. He was also an attorney and partner in the Baton Rouge and New Orleans law firm of Chaffe McCall.

Sen. Kennedy graduated magna cum laude in political science, philosophy, and economics from Vanderbilt, was president of his senior class, and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He received his law degree from the University of Virginia School of Law, where he was an executive editor of the “Virginia Law Review” and elected to the Order of the Coif. He earned a Bachelor of Civil Law degree with first class honors from Oxford University (Magdalen College) in England, where he studied under Sir Rupert Cross and Sir John H. C. Morris.

Sen. Kennedy has written and published the following books and articles: “Louisiana State Constitutional Law,” “The Dimension of Time in the Louisiana Products Liability Act,” “The Role of the Consumer Expectation Test Under Louisiana’s Products Liability Doctrine,” “A Primer on the Louisiana Products Liability Act,” “Assumption of the Risk, Comparative Fault and Strict Liability After Rozell,” and “The Federal Power Commission, Job Bias and NAACP v. FPC.”

Sen. Kennedy served as an adjunct professor at Louisiana State University’s Paul M. Hebert Law Center from 2002 to 2016. He regularly volunteers as a substitute teacher in Louisiana public schools. He resides in Madisonville, Louisiana, with his wife Becky and their dogs, Charlie and Jack. The Kennedy’s are founding members of their local Methodist church.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

  • Senate Republican Conference

Offices

Washington, D.C.

416 Russell Senate Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 224 4623
*Meetings by Appointment Only*

Alexandria

6501 Coliseum Blvd., Suite 700A
Alexandria, LA 71303
(318) 445 2892
*Meetings by Appointment Only*

Baton Rouge

7932 Wrenwood Blvd., Suite A & B
Baton Rouge, LA 70809
(225) 926 8033
*Meetings by Appointment Only*

Houma

Government Towers
8026 Main St., Suite 700
Houma, LA 70360
*Meetings by Appointment Only*

Lafayette

315 S. College Road Suite 140
Lafayette, LA 70503
(337) 269 5980
*Meetings by Appointment Only*

Lake Charles

814 West McNeese Street Suite 213
Lake Charles, LA 70605
(337) 573-6800
*Meetings by Appointment Only*

Mandeville

21490 Koop Dr.
Building A
Mandeville, LA 70471
*Meetings by Appointment Only*

Monroe

1651 Louisville Ave., Suite 148
Monroe, LA 71201
(318) 361 1489
*Meetings by Appointment Only*

New Orleans

500 Poydras St., Suite 364
New Orleans, LA 70130
(504) 581 6190
*Meetings by Appointment Only*

Shreveport

401 Market St., Suite 1050
Shreveport, LA 71101
(318) 670 5192
*Meetings by Appointment Only*

 

Contact

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Web

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Politics

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Voting Record

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Wikipedia Entry

John Neely Kennedy (born November 21, 1951), is an American lawyer and politician who has served as the junior United States senator from Louisiana since 2017. A Democrat turned Republican, he served as the Louisiana State Treasurer from 2000 to 2017.

Born in Centreville, Mississippi, Kennedy graduated from Vanderbilt University and the University of Virginia School of Law before attending Magdalen College, Oxford. He was a member of Governor Buddy Roemer‘s staff before running for state attorney general in the 1991 election. In 1999, he was elected state treasurer; he was reelected to that position in 2003, 2007, 2011, and 2015. Kennedy was an unsuccessful candidate for U.S. Senate in 2004 and 2008. In 2007, he switched parties and became a Republican.

In 2016, when U.S. Senator David Vitter opted not to seek reelection, Kennedy once again ran for Senate. He finished first in the November nonpartisan blanket primary and defeated Democrat Foster Campbell 61–39% in the December runoff. He was sworn in on January 3, 2017. Kennedy was one of six Republican senators to object to the certification of Arizona’s electors in the 2020 presidential election.

Kennedy is running for reelection to a second term in the 2022 election.[2]

Early life and education

Kennedy was born in Centreville, Mississippi, and raised in Zachary, Louisiana. After graduating from Zachary High School as co-valedictorian in 1969, he entered Vanderbilt University, where his interdepartmental major was in political science, philosophy and economics. He graduated magna cum laude.

At Vanderbilt, Kennedy was elected president of his senior class and named to Phi Beta Kappa. He received a Juris Doctor in 1977 from the University of Virginia School of Law in Charlottesville, Virginia, where he was an executive editor of the Virginia Law Review and elected to the Order of the Coif.[3] In 1979, he earned a Bachelor of Civil Law degree with first class honours from Magdalen College, Oxford,[4][5] where he studied under Sir Rupert Cross and John H.C. Morris.[citation needed]

Early career

Kennedy has written and published the following books and articles: Louisiana State Constitutional Law (LSU Publications Institute, Jan. 1, 2012), The Dimension of Time in the Louisiana Products Liability Act (42 Louisiana Bar Journal, Jan. 1, 1994), The Role of the Consumer Expectation Test Under Louisiana’s Products Liability Doctrine (69 Tulane Law Review 117, Jan. 1, 1994), A Primer on the Louisiana Products Liability Act (49 Louisiana Law Review 565, Jan. 1, 1989), Assumption of the Risk, Comparative Fault and Strict Liability After Rozell (47 Louisiana Law Review 791, Jan. 1, 1987) and The Federal Power Commission, Job Bias, and NAACP v. FPC (10 Akron Law Review 556, Jan. 1, 1977).

Kennedy was a partner in the New Orleans law firm Chaffe McCall. He also served as an adjunct professor at Louisiana State University’s Paul M. Hebert Law Center in Baton Rouge from 2002 to 2016.[6]

Early political career

In 1988, Kennedy became special counsel to Governor Buddy Roemer.[7] In 1991, he was appointed as cabinet secretary and served in that post until 1992. In 1991, he was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for state attorney general to succeed the retiring William J. Guste.[8]

Following his first stint in state government, Kennedy returned to private law practice until 1996. That year, he was appointed secretary of the state Department of Revenue in the cabinet of Governor Mike Foster.[9]

Treasurer of Louisiana

Kennedy at the Natchitoches Christmas Parade in 2014

Kennedy left the Foster administration when he was elected Louisiana State Treasurer in 1999, having unseated incumbent Democrat , 621,796 votes (55.6%) to 497,319 (44.4%).[10] Kennedy was reelected treasurer without opposition in 2003, 2007 and 2011.[11] In 2015, he defeated his sole challenger with 80% of the vote.

In the 2004 election, Kennedy endorsed Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry over George W. Bush.[12]

After being courted by the Republican Party for months, Kennedy announced in a letter to his constituents that he was leaving the Democratic Party and joining the Republicans, effective August 27, 2007. In his letter, he announced that he would run again for state treasurer.[13]

During his third term as state treasurer, Kennedy devised a 24-point plan by which the state could save money.[14] Governor Bobby Jindal said Kennedy could “streamline” his own department. Many of Kennedy’s ideas were derived from the Louisiana Commission for Streamlining Government, on which he served in his official capacity as state treasurer.[15]

U.S. Senate

Elections

2004

Then-President-elect Donald Trump and Kennedy campaigning in Baton Rouge

In 2004, Kennedy ran for the U.S. Senate seat held by John Breaux, who was retiring. He ran as a Democrat in the state’s jungle primary, losing to Republican David Vitter and Democrat Chris John.[16] Vitter won the election outright.[13][17]

2008

Kennedy ran for the Senate again in 2008, this time as a Republican. He was defeated, 52.1% to 45.7%, by incumbent Democratic Senator Mary Landrieu; the same year, Republican presidential nominee John McCain defeated Barack Obama in Louisiana, but Obama was elected.[18][19]

2016

On January 26, 2016, Kennedy announced that he would run for Senate a third time. In seeking to succeed the retiring Vitter, he faced more than 20 opponents.[20] Vitter announced his retirement from the Senate in 2015 after losing a bid for governor to John Bel Edwards.[21]

Kennedy’s senatorial campaign was endorsed by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the National Federation of Independent Business, the National Rifle Association, the National Right to Life Committee, the American Conservative Union, Vice President-elect Mike Pence and President-elect Donald Trump.[22][23] Kennedy, who had supported Vitter for governor the previous year, won the jungle primary and faced Democrat Foster Campbell in a December 10 runoff election. President-elect Donald Trump—who had received Kennedy’s support in the 2016 presidential election[24]—campaigned for Kennedy the day before the runoff.[25] Kennedy defeated Campbell, 536,204 votes (61%) to 347,813 (39%). He lost the largest populated parishes of Orleans and East Baton Rouge, in which he had been reared, but was a runaway winner in Campbell’s home parish of Bossier.[26]

Tenure

Kennedy was sworn in as Louisiana‘s junior U.S. Senator on January 3, 2017. On March 10, 2021, the Center for Effective Lawmaking ranked Kennedy as one of the top 10 most effective Republican senators of the 116th Congress, and as the most effective GOP senator in the areas of commerce, education, and trade.[27]

On July 29, 2021, President Joe Biden signed Kennedy’s DUMP Opioids Act into law, making that Kennedy’s eighth piece of legislation to become law in his first term as a U.S. senator.[28] Kennedy has authored more bills signed into law than any first-term senator from Louisiana except Newton Blanchard, who is tied with Kennedy.[29]

In June 2017, Kennedy “grilled” Education Secretary Betsy DeVos in a hearing before the Appropriations subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Service, Education and Related Agencies. In the exchange, he contrasted the lack of school choice available to younger pupils in many rural areas of the country with the numerous brands of mayonnaise available at grocery stores: “Now I can go down to my overpriced Capitol Hill grocery this afternoon and choose among about six different types of mayonnaise. How come I can’t do that for my kid?” Kennedy asked. The remark attracted national attention. DeVos replied that the Trump administration budget proposal would give parents and students more power and opportunity so that American education could again become “the envy of the world”.[30]

Kennedy has attracted comment for his manner in the Senate. A January 2018 Huffington Post article reported: “Since being elected to the Senate a year ago, Kennedy … has made a name for himself on Capitol Hill with his wit, humor and penchant for folksy expressions―a notable feat in a place where jargon and arcane procedure tend to reign supreme”.[31]

In the months leading up to the 2019 election, Kennedy was mentioned as a prospective candidate for governor in the jungle primary against Democratic incumbent John Bel Edwards, but on December 3, 2018, he announced that he would not run for governor, saying he preferred to remain in the Senate.[32]

2020 presidential election

Kennedy announced that he would, along with 11 other Republican senators, object to certain states’ electoral votes in the 2021 United States Electoral College vote count on January 6, unless there was an audit of the vote,[33][34][35] He was participating in the certification when Trump supporters stormed the United States Capitol. He described the attack as “despicable and shameful” and called for the rioters “to go to jail and pay for the destruction they caused.”[36] When the Capitol was secured and Congress returned to complete the certification, Kennedy objected to the certification of Arizona’s electoral votes.[37][38]

Committee assignments

Caucuses

Political positions

Kennedy received a lifetime Liberty Score of 65% from Conservative Review.[39] He holds a score of 89% for the 116th Congress and a lifetime score of 78% from Heritage Action for America.[40] The American Conservative Union’s Center of Legislative Accountability gives Kennedy a lifetime rating of 83.74.[41] His Humane Society Legislative Fund rating has ranged between 67% (2019) and 28% (2017), with his last (2020) at 57%.[42] On infrastructure, the National Association of Police Organizations rates Kennedy at 60% and the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) has assigned him a rating of 8% on matters concerning labor unions.[42]

Animal rights

Kennedy said he would file a bill to “prohibit airlines from putting animals in overhead bins” after a dog died in an overhead bin while flying United Airlines in March 2018.[43] He said “officials would face significant fines” if noncompliant.[44] In March 2018, Kennedy introduced the Welfare Of Our Furry Friends (WOOFF) Act, but the bill died in committee.[45]

Abortion

Kennedy is “strongly opposed” to abortion.[46]

Banking

In March 2019, Kennedy introduced the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, which became law on December 18, 2020.[47] The law prohibits any company from listing on an American stock exchange if it refuses to allow the Public Companies Accounting Oversight Board to audit its annual private audit for three consecutive years. It also requires companies to disclose whether they are owned by a foreign government.[48]

Greenhouse emissions

In 2019, Kennedy introduced the American Innovation and Manufacturing Act,[49] co-sponsored by Senator Tom Carper as an amendment to the American Energy Innovation Act. It would direct the Environmental Protection Agency to phase down production and consumption of hydrofluorocarbons over the next 15 years.[50] Hydrofluorocarbons are potent greenhouse gases used primarily as coolants in refrigerators and air conditioning systems. The American Innovation and Manufacturing Act became law in December 2020 as part of the annual government funding bill.[51]

Guns

Kennedy has an “A” rating from the National Rifle Association (NRA), which endorsed him during his 2016 Senate run.[52][53]

Judicial nominees

Kennedy crossed party lines to oppose the appointment of three of Trump’s U.S. District Court judicial nominees who Kennedy believed were not qualified: Jeff Mateer, Brett Talley, and Matthew S. Petersen. The White House withdrew all three nominations.[54] On December 13, 2017, during Petersen’s confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Kennedy asked Petersen about basic legal procedure,[55] whether he knew what the Daubert standard was, and what a motion in limine was. Petersen struggled to answer.[56][57] Kennedy also voted against the nomination of Gregory G. Katsas to the D.C. Circuit, but Katsas was confirmed.[58]

Criminal justice

Kennedy opposed the First Step Act, a bipartisan criminal justice reform bill. The bill passed 87–12 on December 18, 2018.[59]

Net neutrality

On March 7, 2018, Kennedy introduced a bill that would “prohibit companies like Comcast and Verizon from blocking or throttling web content.”[60] He was one of three Republican senators, with Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski, to vote with the entirety of the Democratic caucus on May 16, 2018, to overturn the FCC‘s repeal of net neutrality.

Foreign policy

In April 2018, Kennedy was one of eight Republican senators to sign a letter to United States Secretary of the Treasury Steve Mnuchin and acting Secretary of State John Sullivan expressing “deep concern” over a report by the United Nations exposing “North Korean sanctions evasion involving Russia and China” and asserting that the findings “demonstrate an elaborate and alarming military-venture between rogue, tyrannical states to avoid United States and international sanctions and inflict terror and death upon thousands of innocent people” while calling it “imperative that the United States provides a swift and appropriate response to the continued use of chemical weapons used by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his forces, and works to address the shortcomings in sanctions enforcement.”[61]

In January 2019, Kennedy was one of 11 Republican senators to vote to advance legislation intended to block Trump’s intent to lift sanctions against three Russian companies.[62]

January 6 commission

On May 28, 2021, Kennedy voted against creating a commission proposed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi[63] to investigate the United States Capitol attack that occurred on January 6, 2021.[64][65]

Personal life

Kennedy resides in Madisonville in St. Tammany Parish outside New Orleans with his wife, Becky. He is a founding member of his local Methodist church in Madisonville.[6] Despite sharing the first and last name of the 35th President of the United States, he is not related to the Kennedy family of Massachusetts.[66]

Electoral history

Louisiana United States Senate election, 2004
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanDavid Vitter 943,014 51.03%
DemocraticChris John542,15029.34%
DemocraticJohn Kennedy275,82114.92%
DemocraticArthur A. Morrell47,2222.56%
IndependentRichard M. Fontanesi15,0970.82%
IndependentR. A. “Skip” Galan12,4630.67%
DemocraticSam Houston Melton, Jr.12,2890.66%
Majority400,86421.69%
Turnout1,848,056
Republican gain from Democratic
Louisiana United States Senate election, 2008
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticMary Landrieu (incumbent) 988,298 52.11% +0.41%
RepublicanJohn Kennedy867,17745.72%-2.58%
LibertarianRichard Fontanesi18,5900.98%n/a
IndependentJay Patel13,7290.72%n/a
IndependentRobert Stewart8,7800.46%n/a
Majority121,1216.39%+2.99
Turnout1,896,574100
Democratic hold
2016 Louisiana US Senate blanket primary[67]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanJohn Kennedy482,59125.0%
DemocraticFoster Campbell337,83317.5%
RepublicanCharles Boustany298,00815.4%
DemocraticCaroline Fayard240,91712.5%
RepublicanJohn Fleming204,02610.6%
RepublicanRob Maness90,8564.7%
RepublicanDavid Duke58,6063.0%
DemocraticDerrick Edwards51,7742.7%
DemocraticGary Landrieu45,5872.4%
RepublicanDonald “Crawdaddy” Crawford25,5231.3%
RepublicanJoseph Cao21,0191.1%
No partyBeryl Billiot19,3521.0%
LibertarianThomas Clements11,3700.6%
No partyTroy Hebert9,5030.5%
DemocraticJosh Pellerin7,3950.4%
DemocraticPeter Williams6,8550.4%
DemocraticVinny Mendoza4,9270.3%
No partyKaitlin Marone4,1080.2%
LibertarianLe Roy Gillam4,0670.2%
RepublicanCharles Eugene Marsala3,6840.2%
RepublicanAbhay Patel1,5760.1%
No partyArden Wells1,4830.1%
OtherBob Lang1,4240.1%
OtherGregory Taylor1,1510.1%
Total1,933,635100
United States Senate election in Louisiana, 2016[68]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanJohn Kennedy 536,191 60.65% +4.09%
DemocraticFoster Campbell347,81639.35%+1.68%
Total votes884,007 100 N/A
Republican hold

Selected publications

Kennedy has written and published the following books and articles:

See also

References

  1. ^ “Brett Crawford Appointed Acting Revenue Secretary”. rev.louisiana.gov. May 3, 1999. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  2. ^ “Sen. John Kennedy launches 2022 re-election bid: ‘I will not let you down. I’d rather drink weed killer.’. foxnews.com. June 2021. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  3. ^ Bernstein, Mark F. (May 28, 2017). “The First Year Senator”. University of Virginia School of Law. Retrieved December 15, 2017.
  4. ^ “Southeastern Louisiana University FACULTY SENATE Meeting Minutes” (PDF).
  5. ^ “About Treasurer Kennedy”. treasury.state.la.us. Archived from the original on November 27, 2015. Retrieved November 18, 2016.
  6. ^ a b “About Treasurer Kennedy”. Louisiana Department of the Treasury. Archived from the original on June 26, 2014. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  7. ^ “Roemer is no-show for opening session”, , April 7, 1991, p. 1
  8. ^ Bridges, Tyler (December 11, 2016). “Here’s the secret to John N. Kennedy’s U.S. Senate win”. The Acadiana Advocate. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  9. ^ , My Name Is Ron And I’m a Recovering Legislator: Memoirs of a Louisiana State Representative, Lafayette, Louisiana: Zemog Publishing, 2000, p. 247;ISBN 0-9700156-0-7
  10. ^ “Louisiana election returns for state treasurer”. Louisiana Secretary of State. October 23, 1999. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  11. ^ Sentell, Will (October 20, 2016). “Louisiana state treasurer John Kennedy hopes third time is charm in U.S. Senate bid”. The Advocate. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  12. ^ Levine, Marianne; Everett, Burgesss (December 3, 2019). “Folksy John Kennedy gets serious pushback on Ukraine mess”. Politico. Retrieved December 4, 2019.
  13. ^ a b Moller, Jan. “Treasurer bolts to GOP”. The Times Picayune. Archived from the original on April 27, 2014. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  14. ^ Kennedy elaborated the plan in many venues across the state. See § III of the following:Ramsey, David (February 9, 2011). “Guest Presentation by State Treasurer John Neely Kennedy” (PDF). Southeastern Louisiana University Faculty Senate Minutes. Retrieved October 8, 2011. A particular focus of Kennedy’s cost-saving ideas was reduction in the hiring of consultants.
  15. ^ “Michelle Milhollin, “Jindal slashes funding for state treasurer: Jindal’s ‘streamlining’ efforts trim critics’ funding”. Baton Rouge Morning Advocate. Archived from the original on April 27, 2014. Retrieved June 16, 2012.
  16. ^ “Vitter avoids runoff, first Louisiana Republican to Senate”. usatoday30.usatoday.com. November 2, 2004. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  17. ^ “Official Election Results Results for Election Date: 11/2/2004”. Louisiana Secretary of State. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  18. ^ “Louisiana election results”. Louisiana Secretary of State. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  19. ^ Huetteman, Emmarie (February 17, 2017). “Today’s Senator John Kennedy Is From Louisiana”. The New York Times. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  20. ^ Rainey, Richard. “Treasurer John Kennedy enters Senate race to succeed David Vitter”. NOLA.com. The Times Picayune. Retrieved June 27, 2016.
  21. ^ Richardson, Bradford (November 21, 2015). “Vitter announces Senate retirement after losing La. gubernatorial race”. The Hill. Retrieved June 27, 2016.
  22. ^ “U.S. Chamber of Commerce Endorses Kennedy for Senate”. johnkennedy.com. Archived from the original on April 16, 2017. Retrieved April 15, 2017.
  23. ^ Hillyard, Vaughn (December 3, 2016). “Trump, Pence Endorse Louisiana GOP Senate Candidate John Kennedy Ahead of Runoff”. NBC News. Retrieved April 15, 2017.
  24. ^ Deslatte, Melinda. “Louisiana’s Republican Senate U.S. candidates stick with Trump”. Daily Comet. Archived from the original on October 12, 2016. Retrieved November 25, 2016 – via Associated Press.
  25. ^ Rainey, Richard (December 10, 2016). “Donald Trump campaigns in Baton Rouge, this time for Senate candidate John Kennedy”. nola.com. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  26. ^ “Louisiana Secretary of State Official Election Results Results for Election Date: 11/8/2016 – US Senator”. Louisiana Secretary of State.
  27. ^ “Highlights from the New 116th Congress Legislative Effectiveness Scores”. Center for Effective Lawmaking. March 10, 2021. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  28. ^ “Congress.gov advanced search”. Congress.gov. July 27, 2021. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  29. ^ “Even with cornpone jokes, John N. Kennedy leverages his position for state”. The Advocate. September 1, 2021. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  30. ^ Deborah Barfield Berry (June 6, 2017). “La. senator brings up mayonnaise during education hearing”. USA Today. Retrieved June 8, 2017.
  31. ^ Bobic, Igor (January 25, 2018). “Meet The Folksiest Man In The U.S. Senate”. The Huffington Post. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  32. ^ Hilburn, Greg (December 3, 2018). “Kennedy won’t run for governor of Louisiana”. The Shreveport Times. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  33. ^ “Joint Statement from Senators Cruz, Johnson, Lankford, Daines, Kennedy, Blackburn, Braun, Senators-Elect Lummis, Marshall, Hagerty, Tuberville”. U.S. Senator for Texas Ted Cruz. January 2, 2021. Retrieved April 9, 2021.
  34. ^ Hilburn, Greg (January 2, 2021). “Louisiana Republican Senator John Kennedy seeks to block Joe Biden’s Electoral College win”. The News-Star. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  35. ^ Investigator, David Hammer / Eyewitness (May 12, 2021). “Sen. Kennedy says he refused GOP calls to overturn Biden’s win over Trump”. wwltv.com. Retrieved July 18, 2021.
  36. ^ Fatherree, Dwayne (January 8, 2021). “Resignations mount in wake of mob attack on Capitol”. The Daily Iberian. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  37. ^ U.S. Senate (January 6, 2021). “Roll Call Vote 117th Congress – 1st Session—Vote Summary: Question: On the Objection (Shall the Objection Submitted by the Gentleman from Arizona, Mr. Gosar, and the Senator from Texas, Mr. Cruz, and Others Be Sustained?)”. U.S. Senate Legislation and Records. Retrieved January 19, 2021.
  38. ^ Braun, Paul (January 8, 2021). “5 Louisiana Congressmen Voted To Overturn Biden's Presidential Win. Here's What They Had To Say”. WWNO. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  39. ^ “Liberty Score Conservative Review”. Conservative Review (Blaze Media LLC). 2021. Retrieved April 9, 2021.
  40. ^ “Sen. John Kennedy”. Heritage Action for America. December 12, 2020. Retrieved April 9, 2021.
  41. ^ “Sen. John Kennedy”. American Conservative Union Foundation. Retrieved May 5, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)[permanent dead link]
  42. ^ a b “John Kennedy’s Ratings and Endorsements”. Vote Smart. Retrieved November 23, 2021.
  43. ^ Anapol, Avery (March 15, 2018). “GOP senator opposed to gun control mocked for bill proposal after airline pet death”. The Hill. Retrieved March 16, 2018.
  44. ^ Connolly, Griffin (March 15, 2018). “After Dog Dies On United Airlines Flight Sen. John Kennedy Proposes Bill”. Roll Call. Retrieved March 16, 2018.
  45. ^ “S.2556 – Welfare Of Our Furry Friends (WOOFF) Act”. congress.gov. March 15, 2018. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  46. ^ “Republican John Kennedy wins Louisiana senate race in runoff election”. CNBC. December 10, 2016. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  47. ^ “S.945 – Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act”. Congress.gov. December 18, 2020.
  48. ^ “S.945 – Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act”. Congress.gov. December 18, 2020.
  49. ^ “S.2754 – American Innovation and Manufacturing Act of 2019 Legislation”. Congress.gov. October 30, 2019.
  50. ^ “Carper and Kennedy Introduce Bill to Phasedown Use of HFCs”. U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public. November 1, 2019. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  51. ^ “Senators Announce Historic, Bipartisan Agreement on Environmental Innovation Legislation”. U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public. December 21, 2020.
  52. ^ “The Voter’s Self Defense System”. Vote Smart. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  53. ^ “New NRA Ad Urges Voters to Elect John Kennedy for U.S. Senate”. NRA-ILA. December 8, 2016. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  54. ^ Hohmann, James (December 19, 2017). “The Daily 202: Why a Louisiana GOP senator keeps bringing down Trump judicial nominees”. The Washington Post. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  55. ^ Bowden, John (December 14, 2017). “Dem senator bashes Trump judicial nominee over hearing testimony: ‘Hoo-boy’. The Hill. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  56. ^ Bromwich, Jonah Engel; Chokshi, Niraj (December 15, 2017). “Trump Judicial Nominee Attracts Scorn After Flopping in Hearing”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  57. ^ Hawkins, Derek (December 15, 2017). Trump judicial nominee fumbles basic questions about the law, The Washington Post, December 15, 2017 Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  58. ^ U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 115th Congress – 1st Session United States Senate Vote Summary: Vote Number 282, United States Senate, November 27, 2017, Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  59. ^ Levine, Marianne (December 18, 2018). “Senate approves Trump-backed criminal justice overhaul”. Politico. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  60. ^ Neidig, Harper (March 7, 2018). “GOP senator offers his own net neutrality bill”. The Hill. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  61. ^ Mitchell, Ellen (April 13, 2018). “Key senators warn Trump of North Korea effort on Syria”. The Hill. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  62. ^ Carney, Jordain (January 15, 2019). “Senate advances measure bucking Trump on Russia sanctions”. The Hill. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  63. ^ “Proposal for 9/11-style commission to probe Capitol attack mired in partisanship”. NBC News. February 24, 2021. Retrieved September 14, 2021.
  64. ^ Stevenson, Peter; Blanco, Adrian; Santamariña, Daniela (May 28, 2021). “Which senators supported a Jan. 6 Capitol riot commission”. Washington Post. Retrieved May 29, 2021.
  65. ^ “Roll Call Vote 117th Congress – 1st Session”. United States Senate. May 28, 2021. Retrieved July 10, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  66. ^ Akers, Mary Ann (June 13, 2008). “The Sleuth: John Kennedy, a Politician by Any Other Name.”Washington Post. Archived from the original.
  67. ^ “Official Election Results”. Louisiana Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved November 17, 2016.
  68. ^ “Louisiana Secretary of State – Live Election Results”. voterportal.sos.la.gov.

External links

Party political offices
Vacant

Title last held by


1995

Democratic nominee for Treasurer of Louisiana
2003
Vacant

Title next held by

Derrick Edwards
2017

New title Republican nominee for Treasurer of Louisiana
2007, 2011, 2015
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Louisiana
(Class 2)

2008
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Louisiana
(Class 3)

2016
Most recent
Political offices
Preceded by

Treasurer of Louisiana
2000–2017
Succeeded by

U.S. Senate
Preceded by

David Vitter
U.S. senator (Class 3) from Louisiana
2017–present
Served alongside: Bill Cassidy
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

as United States Senator from New Hampshire

Order of precedence of the United States
as United States Senator from Louisiana

since January 3, 2017
Succeeded by

as United States Senator from Indiana

United States senators by seniority
79th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

  • Committee on Appropriations
    • Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development
    • Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government
  • Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs
    • Subcommittee on Economic Policy
    • Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Protection
    • Subcommittee on Housing, Transportation, and Community Development
  • Committee on the Budget
  • Committee on the Judiciary
    • Subcommittee on Border Security and Immigration
    • Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism
    • Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law
    • Subcommittee on Intellectual Property
  • Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

Fighting for jobs in Louisiana

I want an America and a Louisiana where every person can get a decent job. But you can’t be for jobs if you’re against business, and you can’t be for business if you’re writing rules that tie the hands of our job creators. In the 1950s, only one American worker in 20 needed a government permit. Today, it’s one in three.

In my view, if you want to start a landscaping business, all you should need is a lawnmower: not a lawnmower, a lawyer, a CPA, and a compliance officer. We’ve already begun the process of repealing regulations to streamline the government contracting and infrastructure authorization processes to make them more competitive.

As a member of the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee, I am committed to promoting policies that will bring good paying jobs back to Louisiana, reduce red tape, and offer Louisiana’s hardworking small business owners some much needed tax relief.

Health care, not Obamacare

As I continue to travel around our state, I hear Louisianans talk about how devastating Obamacare has been for their families and small businesses. I remain committed to replacing Obamacare with a health care system that looks like it was designed on purpose. I want a country and a state in which a mother can take her sick child to a family doctor instead of an emergency room because her family has effective, affordable health insurance from the private sector.

Right now, the U.S. spends more money on health care each year than the entire government budgets of all but five countries. Americans should not be forced to buy insurance they don’t like at prices they can’t afford. Here’s what we need instead: more choice, more competition, less fraud, and a health care delivery system that puts patients and their doctors in charge instead of Washington politicians and bureaucrats.

Bringing flood insurance into the 21st century

This year, many of Louisiana’s 64 parishes are again recovering from some kind of natural disaster. Families and businesses across our state rely on the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) for insurance protection from future floods and hurricanes. But the NFIP is broken. A flood insurance program isn’t doing its job if it’s too expensive to afford, or if it allows bad actors to take from hardworking families struggling to get back on their feet.

We need simpler rules, affordable premiums, quicker decisions by government bureaucrats, accountability for contractors, government websites that a normal person can navigate, and government workers who answer the phone. When a disaster strikes, our families need a smiling face and a hand to help them pick up the pieces—not a Washington bureaucrat with a stack of paperwork.

I’ve introduced bipartisan legislation that would not only extend the NFIP, but would encourage lower premiums and invest into mitigation projects for families, helping Louisiana to be better prepared for the next storm.

Funding flood recovery, not government bureaucracy

Recovering from a natural disaster is about more than rebuilding structures: It’s about restoring our communities. Since coming to Congress, I have fought hard to ensure that federal disaster assistance, low-interest disaster loans, and NFIP payments are going to the Louisianians who need them—not just into the pockets of contractors and bureaucrats.

I will continue fighting to ensure that Louisiana has the time and resources needed to come back from hurricanes, floods, and other natural disasters stronger and better prepared than ever.

Getting America’s fiscal house in order

I want us to live in a country and a state that respects taxpayer dollars. Washington spending is out of control, our budget process doesn’t work, and our nation is more than $25 trillion in debt.

I support a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution, and I will continue working aggressively to end waste, duplicative programs, and fraudulent or improper payments. Our country started out self-reliant, lightly-taxed, and debt-free: It’s time to get back to our roots.

Defending the unborn

All life is precious and a gift from God, whether that life is 82 years old, 82 seconds old, or unborn. In my time in the Senate, I have made protecting life a priority by cosponsoring several pieces of legislation that would prohibit taxpayer dollars from going to Planned Parenthood; protect born-alive survivors of attempted abortions; and defend conscience protections for health care providers, insurers, and business owners.

I remain focused on supporting families who adopt or foster children and funding pro-life crisis pregnancy centers. The greatest thing we can do as a society is cherish and defend God-given life. I’ll never stop standing for the most vulnerable among us. I will always defend the rights of the unborn.

Life-changing education

Education has the power to change lives. No parent should have to send his or her child to a failing school. Too many of our kids are trapped in schools where violence is more common than learning.

I’ve been a substitute teacher in Louisiana public schools for years, so I’ve seen firsthand that quality education is the key to Louisiana’s future. Improving our education system starts with getting the federal government out of our curriculum and classrooms and with giving teachers the resources and authority they need to do their jobs. We need to take taxpayer money and invest it in bettering schools—schools that work for young Louisianians.

X
Bill CassidyBill Cassidy – LA

Current Position: US Senator since 2015
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Physician from 1983 – 2015

Featured Quote: 
FEMA and the federal government shouldn’t be reinventing the wheel after every disaster. I’m working on legislation to ensure we learn from what works and what doesn’t to strengthen our response and better help families recover after natural disasters.

Featured Video: 
Senator Bill Cassidy gives statement after vote to convict Trump

WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Senators Bill Cassidy, M.D. (R-LA), Rob Portman (R-OH), Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), and Mitt Romney (R-UT) issued the following statement, urging the House of Representatives to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill:

“Passage of the historic bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act on Monday would be a great victory for the American people. It will modernize and upgrade our roads, bridges, ports, and broadband; increase the resiliency of our electric grid and coastal areas; and create jobs and long-term economic growth without raising taxes on everyday Americans or increasing inflation.

“Importantly, this bipartisan bill is a testament to what Congress can achieve when we put partisanship aside and focus on moving the country forward. Congress has talked about modernizing our nation’s infrastructure for as long as we can remember. The bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act deserves the support of House Republicans and Democrats alike. We urge the House of Representatives to pass the bill on Monday when it comes up for a vote before the existing surface transportation authorization expires.”

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 2015
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Physician from 1983 – 2015

Featured Quote: 
FEMA and the federal government shouldn’t be reinventing the wheel after every disaster. I’m working on legislation to ensure we learn from what works and what doesn’t to strengthen our response and better help families recover after natural disasters.

Featured Video: 
Senator Bill Cassidy gives statement after vote to convict Trump

News

WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Senators Bill Cassidy, M.D. (R-LA), Rob Portman (R-OH), Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), and Mitt Romney (R-UT) issued the following statement, urging the House of Representatives to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill:

“Passage of the historic bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act on Monday would be a great victory for the American people. It will modernize and upgrade our roads, bridges, ports, and broadband; increase the resiliency of our electric grid and coastal areas; and create jobs and long-term economic growth without raising taxes on everyday Americans or increasing inflation.

“Importantly, this bipartisan bill is a testament to what Congress can achieve when we put partisanship aside and focus on moving the country forward. Congress has talked about modernizing our nation’s infrastructure for as long as we can remember. The bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act deserves the support of House Republicans and Democrats alike. We urge the House of Representatives to pass the bill on Monday when it comes up for a vote before the existing surface transportation authorization expires.”

Twitter

About

Bill Cassidy 1

Source: Government page

Dr. Bill Cassidy is the United States Senator for Louisiana.

Bill grew up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and attended Louisiana State University (LSU) for undergraduate and medical school. In 1990, Bill joined LSU Medical School teaching medical students and residents at Earl K. Long Hospital, a hospital for the uninsured.

During this time, he co-founded the Greater Baton Rouge Community Clinic, a clinic providing free dental and health care to the working uninsured. Bill also created a private-public partnership to vaccinate 36,000 greater Baton Rouge area children against Hepatitis B at no cost to the schools or parents. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, Bill led a group of health care volunteers to convert an abandoned K-Mart building into an emergency health care facility, providing basic health care to hurricane evacuees.

In 2006, Bill was elected to the Louisiana State Senate.

In 2008, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives to represent Louisiana’s Sixth Congressional District.

In 2014, he was elected to the U.S. Senate. He serves on the Finance Committee, the Health, Education, Labor, & Pensions Committee, the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, and the Veterans Affairs committees.

Bill is married to Dr. Laura Cassidy and they have three children. Laura is a retired general surgeon specializing in breast cancer. She helped found a public charter school to teach children with dyslexia. Bill, Laura and their family attend church at the Chapel on the Campus.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

While in the House of Representatives, Cassidy was a member of many congressional caucuses, including the House Tea Party Caucus and Republican Study Committee.

Experience

Work Experience

  • Senator
    Louisiana State Senate
    2006 to 2008
  • Representative
    Louisiana’s 6th Congressional District
    2009 to 2015

Education

Personal

Birth Year: 1957
Place of Birth: Highland Park, IL
Gender: Male
Race(s): Caucasian
Religion: Christian
Spouse:  Laura Layden Cassidy
Children: Meg Cassidy, Kate Cassidy, Will Cassidy

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington D.C. Office
520 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
Phone: (202) 224-5824

Lafayette Office
101 La Rue France, Ste. 505
Lafayette, LA 70508
Phone: (337) 261-1400
Fax: (337) 261-1490

Shreveport Office
6425 Youree Dr., Ste. 415
Shreveport, LA 71105
Phone: (318) 798-3215
Fax: (318) 798-6959

Monroe Office
1651 Louisville Ave, Ste. 123
Monroe, LA 71201
Phone: (318) 324-2111
Fax: (318) 324-2197

Metairie Office
3421 N. Causeway Blvd, Ste. 204
Metairie, LA 70002
Phone: (504) 838-0130
Fax: (504) 838-0133

Web

Government Page, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Campaign Site

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

William Morgan Cassidy (born September 28, 1957) is an American physician and politician serving as the senior United States senator from Louisiana, a seat he has held since 2015.[1] A member of the Republican Party, he served in the Louisiana State Senate from 2006 to 2009 and in the U.S. House of Representatives from 2009 to 2015.

Born in Highland Park, Illinois, Cassidy is a graduate of Louisiana State University (LSU) and LSU School of Medicine. A gastroenterologist, he was elected to the Louisiana State Senate from the 16th district which included parts of Baton Rouge, in 2006. In 2008, he was elected as the U.S. representative for Louisiana’s 6th congressional district, defeating Democratic incumbent Don Cazayoux. In 2014, Cassidy defeated Democratic incumbent Mary Landrieu to represent Louisiana in the U.S. Senate, becoming the first Republican to hold the seat since Reconstruction. He was reelected in 2020.

Cassidy was one of seven Republican senators to vote to convict Donald Trump of incitement of insurrection in his second impeachment trial. As a result, the Republican Party of Louisiana censured him.[2]

Early life and education

William Morgan Cassidy was born in Highland Park, Illinois, one of four sons of Elizabeth and James F. Cassidy, and is of Irish and Welsh descent.[3] He grew up in Baton Rouge and received a Bachelor of Science from Louisiana State University in 1979 and a Doctor of Medicine from LSU School of Medicine in 1983.[4]

Early career

Medicine

Cassidy specialized in the treatment of diseases of the liver at the Earl K. Long Medical Center (LSUMC).[5]

In 1998, Cassidy helped found the Greater Baton Rouge Community Clinic to provide uninsured residents of the greater Baton Rouge area with access to free health care. The Clinic provides low-income families with free dental, medical, mental health, and vision care through a “virtual” approach that partners needy patients with doctors who provide care free of charge.[6]

Cassidy has also been involved in setting up the nonprofit Health Centers in Schools, which vaccinates children in the East Baton Rouge Parish School System against hepatitis B and flu.[7][8]

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, Cassidy led a group of health care volunteers to convert an abandoned K-Mart into an emergency health care facility, providing basic health care to hurricane victims.[9]

In 2010, Cassidy’s alma mater, Louisiana State University, selected him for honoris causa membership in Omicron Delta Kappa, the National Leadership Honor Society.

Politics

Cassidy was first elected to the Louisiana State Senate in 2006 as a Republican. He had previously been a Democrat, supporting Michael Dukakis for president in 1988, donating to Senator Paul Tsongas‘s 1992 presidential campaign,[10][11] and to Louisiana Democrats Governor Kathleen Blanco in 2003 and 2004 and Senator Mary Landrieu in 2002. In 2013, Cassidy called his donation to Landrieu a “youthful indiscretion”, saying that she “got elected and fell into partisan politics… Louisiana hasn’t left Mary, Mary has left us.” Since 2001, he has mostly contributed to Republican candidates, including Senator David Vitter. According to Cassidy, he switched parties after the extinction of conservative Democrats and because of his frustration with the bureaucracy and inefficiency of the public hospital system.[11][12]

On December 9, 2006, Cassidy won a special election for the District 16 seat in the Louisiana Senate. In his first bid for public office, he defeated veteran State Representative William Daniel, a fellow Republican and Libertarian candidate S.B. Zaitoon.[13] The election was held to replace Jay Dardenne, who vacated the seat he had held since 1992 upon his election as Louisiana Secretary of State.[citation needed] Cassidy was sworn in on December 20, 2006. On October 20, 2007, he was reelected to a full four-year term in the Louisiana State Senate. Cassidy received 76% of the vote against Republican Troy “Rocco” Moreau (15%) and Libertarian Richard Fontanesi (9%).[14]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

On November 4, 2008, Cassidy was elected to serve Louisiana’s 6th district in the U.S. House of Representatives, defeating incumbent Democratic Congressman Don Cazayoux with 48% of the vote.[15] He likely owed his victory to the independent candidacy of state representative Michael L. Jackson. Jackson finished third with 36,100 votes, more than the 25,000-vote margin separating Cassidy and Cazayoux.

In the 2010 midterm elections, Cassidy easily won a second term, defeating Democrat Merritt E. McDonald of Baton Rouge with 66% of the vote.[16] In the 2012 election, Cassidy was reelected again defeating Rufus Holt Craig, Jr., a Libertarian, and Richard Torregano, an Independent. Cassidy received 79% of the vote.[17]

Tenure

In May 2009, Cassidy partnered with California Representative Jackie Speier to introduce legislation that would amend the House of Representatives rules to require that members of Congress list their earmark requests on their Congressional websites. Previous earmark reform efforts had focused on disclosure of earmarks that were funded by Congress.[18] In June 2010, he introduced the Gulf Coast Jobs Preservation Act to terminate the moratorium on deep water drilling and require the Secretary of the Interior to ensure the safety of deep water drilling operations.[19][20] He worked to ensure that money from the Gulf Coast Restoration Trust Fund which was established in the wake of the BP oil spill, is spent on coastal restoration efforts.[21]

In December 2010, Cassidy voted to extend the tax cuts enacted during the administration of President George W. Bush.[22] He voted for the Constitutional Balanced Budget Amendment of 2011.[23]

In May 2013, Cassidy introduced the Energy Consumers Relief Act of 2013 (H.R. 1582) to require the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to submit reports to both the United States Congress and the United States Department of Energy regarding proposed regulation that would have significant compliance costs (an impact of over $1 billion).[24][25] The Department of Energy and Congress would then have the option of stopping or altering the EPA proposal.[24]

In 2013, due to the American Medical Association‘s decision to officially recognize obesity as a disease, Senators and Representatives, including Cassidy, helped introduce legislation to lower health care costs and prevent chronic diseases by addressing America’s growing obesity crisis. Cassidy said the Treat and Reduce Obesity Act could help empower physicians to use all methods and means to fight the condition.[26]

In June 2013, Cassidy supported a House-passed bill that federally banned abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy.[27] Also in 2013, Cassidy circulated a draft letter opposing an immigration reform bill, asking for signatures. Representative Mark Takano, a high school literature teacher for 23 years, marked it up in red pen like a school assignment and gave it an F, with comments like, “exaggeration — avoid hyperbole,” and “contradicts earlier statement.”[28]

In 2014 Cassidy co-sponsored an amendment to the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act in 2014 to limit annual premium increases for flood insurance, reinstate the flood insurance program’s grandfathering provision, and eliminate a provision that required an increase to actuarial levels when a home is sold.[29]

Cassidy was a vocal opponent of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly called Obamacare or the Affordable Care Act), arguing that it would fail to lower costs and give too much decision-making authority to the federal government.[30] In September 2014, the House passed the Employee Health Care Protection Act of 2013 (H.R. 3522; 113th Congress), sponsored by Cassidy, enabling Americans to keep health insurance policies that do not meet all of the Affordable Care Act’s requirements.[31] In March 2017, Cassidy sent a letter to one of his constituents that falsely asserted that Obamacare “allows a presidentially handpicked ‘Health Choices Commissioner’ to determine what coverage and treatments are available to you.”[32]

Cassidy supported the Lowering Gasoline Prices to Fuel an America That Works Act of 2014 (H.R. 4899; 113th Congress), a bill to revise existing laws regarding the development of oil and gas resources on the Outer Continental Shelf.[33] The bill is intended to increase domestic energy production and lower gas prices.[34][35] He argued that the bill “would allow us to take advantage of our natural resources and expands our energy manufacturing and construction industries.”[36]

Committee assignments (113th Congress)

Caucuses

While in the House of Representatives, Cassidy was a member of many congressional caucuses,[38] including the House Tea Party Caucus and Republican Study Committee.[39]

U.S. Senate

Bill Cassidy at Hudson Institute, May 2015

Elections

2014

Cassidy ran for the U.S. Senate in the 2014 election, in which he was endorsed by Republican Senator David Vitter. He defeated three-term incumbent Democratic Senator Mary Landrieu in the run-off election held on Saturday, December 6, 2014, receiving 56% of the vote to Landrieu’s 44%. It was the first Republican victory for the seat since William P. Kellogg in 1883.[40][41]

2020

Cassidy was reelected in 2020, and won every parish but one.

Tenure

115th Congress

On May 8, 2017, Cassidy appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live! and discussed health care in the United States.[42] He said that any legislation that he would support must meet the “Jimmy Kimmel test“, namely: “Would a child born with congenital heart disease be able to get everything he or she would need in that first year of life?”[43] Kimmel had earlier chastised Republicans for voting to repeal the Affordable Care Act and replace it with legislation that would not ensure protection for children such as his newborn, who was born with a heart defect that required immediate surgery.[43]

In September 2017, Cassidy and Lindsey Graham introduced legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. The “Graham–Cassidy” bill would eliminate the ACA’s marketplace subsidies, repeal the ACA’s Medicaid expansion, and introduce a temporary block grant that would expire in 2026.[44] The legislation would also impose a per-enrollee cap on Medicaid funding.[44] The Kaiser Family Foundation noted that the legislation “would fundamentally alter the current federal approach to financing health coverage for more than 80 million people who have coverage through the ACA (Medicaid expansion or marketplace) or through the traditional Medicaid program.”[44] An analysis by the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities found that the legislation “would cut federal health care funding by $299 billion relative to current law” in the year 2027 alone and estimated that it would leave 32 million more Americans without health insurance.[45] President Donald Trump endorsed the bill.[46]

The bill does not meet the “Jimmy Kimmel test”, as it would allow states to eliminate requirements to cover children with conditions like that of Kimmel’s child.[43] Kimmel condemned Cassidy, calling him a liar,[43] listed the health organizations that opposed Graham–Cassidy, and urged his viewers to contact their Congressional representatives about the legislation.[43] Cassidy responded to Kimmel, saying that Kimmel “doesn’t understand” the legislation.[47] Cassidy also said that under Graham–Cassidy, “more people will have coverage” than under the Affordable Care Act. According to the Washington Post fact checker, Cassidy “provided little evidence to support his claim of more coverage… the consensus [among health care analysts] is that his funding formula makes his claim all but impossible to achieve.”[47]

117th Congress

Cassidy was participating in the certification of the 2021 United States Electoral College vote count when Trump supporters stormed the United States Capitol. He tweeted during the attack, calling them “hooligans” and the storming “un-American.” He later said the participants were guilty of sedition “and should be prosecuted as such.”[48] When the Capitol was secure and Congress resumed, Cassidy voted to support the certification of the electoral college count.[49]

On February 9, 2021, Cassidy voted that Trump’s impeachment trial was unconstitutional. After the Senate voted that the trial was constitutional, he was one of seven Republicans to vote to convict Trump of inciting insurrection.[50] Hours after the vote, the Republican Party of Louisiana censured him.[2] Cassidy was also praised by several Democrats, including his predecessor Mary Landrieu, whom Cassidy defeated in 2014.[51] On May 27, 2021, along with five other Republicans and all present Democrats, he voted to establish a bipartisan commission to investigate the January 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol. The vote failed for lack of 60 required “yes” votes.[52]

Committee assignments

Caucuses

Political positions

Some regard Cassidy as a moderate Republican.[53] He is ranked highly by conservative organizations. The American Conservative Union’s Center for Legislative Accountability gives Cassidy a lifetime rating of 82.79.[54]

Agriculture

In July 2019, Cassidy was one of eight senators to introduce the Agricultural Trucking Relief Act, a bill that would alter the definition of an agricultural commodity to include both horticultural and aquacultural products and promote greater consistency in regulation by federal and state agencies as part of an attempt to ease regulatory burdens on trucking and the agri-community.[55]

Defense

In July 2019 Cassidy was one of 16 Republican senators to send Acting Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Russell Vought, Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin a letter encouraging them to work with them to prevent a continuing resolution “for FY 2020 that would delay the implementation of the President’s National Defense Strategy (NDS) and increase costs” and arguing that the yearlong continuing resolution administration officials favored would render the Defense Department “incapable of increasing readiness, recapitalizing our force, or rationalizing funding to align with the National Defense Strategy (NDS).”[56]

Gun law

Cassidy opposes gun control, as he believes it would not stop mass shootings or decrease gun crime.[57]

In January 2019, Cassidy was one of 31 Republican senators to cosponsor the Constitutional Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act, a bill introduced by John Cornyn and Ted Cruz that would grant individuals with concealed carry privileges in their home state the right to exercise this right in any other state with concealed carry laws while concurrently abiding by that state’s laws.[58]

Taxes

In 2019, along with Democrats Amy Klobuchar and Doug Jones and Republican Pat Toomey, Cassidy was a lead sponsor of the Gold Star Family Tax Relief Act, a bill that would undo a provision in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act that raised the tax on the benefit children receive from a parent’s Department of Defense survivor benefits plan to 37% from an average of 12% to 15% before the 2017 law. The bill passed in the Senate in May 2019.[59]

On July 30, 2019, Cassidy and Senator Kyrsten Sinema released a proposal under which new parents would be authorized to advance their child tax credit benefits in order to receive a $5,000 cash benefit upon either birth or adoption of a child. The parents’ child tax credit would then be reduced by $500 for each year of the following decade. The senators described their proposal as the first bipartisan paid parental leave plan.[60]

Abortion

Cassidy opposes abortion after 20 weeks and any federal funding for abortion.[61]

Personal life

Cassidy’s wife, Laura (née Layden), is also a physician; they met during their respective residencies in Los Angeles and married on September 29, 1989.[62] In the early 1990s, both worked at the Earl K. Long Medical Center, where Laura was the hospital’s head of surgery. Cassidy worked as a gastroenterologist at the facility until it closed in 2013.[63] They have three children.[64] They are members of The Chapel on the Campus, a nondenominational Christian church that meets on LSU’s campus in Baton Rouge.[65]

On August 20, 2020, Cassidy tested positive for COVID-19.[66]

Electoral history

Louisiana State Senate

Louisiana State Senate, District 16 (2006)[67]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bill Cassidy 8,394 58.06
RepublicanWilliam Daniel5,47237.85
LibertarianS.B.A. Zaitoon5924.09
Total votes14,458 100.00
Republican hold
Louisiana State Senate, District 16 (2007)[68]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bill Cassidy (incumbent) 33,463 75.64
RepublicanTroy “Rocco” Moreau6,78115.33
LibertarianRichard Fontanesi3,9959.03
Total votes44,239 100.00
Republican hold

U.S. House of Representatives

US House of Representatives, 6th District of Louisiana (2008)[69]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bill Cassidy 150,332 48.12
DemocraticDon Cazayoux (incumbent)125,88640.29
No PartyMichael L. Jackson36,19811.59
Total votes312,416 100.00
Republican gain from Democratic
US House of Representatives, 6th District of Louisiana (2010)[70]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bill Cassidy (incumbent) 138,607 65.63
DemocraticMerritt E. McDonald, Sr.72,57734.37
Total votes211,184 100.00
Republican hold
US House of Representatives, 6th District of Louisiana (2012)[71]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bill Cassidy (incumbent) 243,553 79.41
LibertarianRufus Holt Craig, Jr32,18510.49
No PartyRichard “RPT” Torregano30,97510.10
Total votes306,713 100.00
Republican hold

U.S. Senate

United States Senate, Louisiana (2014)[72][73]
Primary election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Mary Landrieu (incumbent) 619,402 42.08
Republican Bill Cassidy 603,048 40.97
RepublicanRob Maness202,55613.76
RepublicanThomas Clements14,1730.96
LibertarianBrannon McMorris13,0340.89
DemocraticWayne Ables11,3230.77
DemocraticWilliam Waymire4,6730.32
DemocraticVallian Senegal3,8350.26
Total votes1,473,826 100.00
General election
Republican Bill Cassidy 712,379 55.93
Democratic Mary Landrieu (incumbent) 561,210 44.07
Total votes1,273,589 100.00
Republican gain from Democratic
United States Senate, Louisiana (2020)[74]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Bill Cassidy (incumbent) 1,228,908 59.32
DemocraticAdrian Perkins394,04919.02
DemocraticDerrick Edwards229,81411.09
DemocraticAntoine Pierce55,7102.69
RepublicanDustin Murphy38,3831.85
DemocraticDrew Knight36,9621.78
IndependentBeryl Billiot17,3620.84
IndependentJohn Paul Bourgeois16,5180.80
DemocraticPeter Wenstrup14,4540.70
LibertarianAaron Sigler11,3210.55
IndependentM.V. “Vinny” Mendoza7,8110.38
IndependentMelinda Mary Price7,6800.37
IndependentJamar Montgomery5,8040.28
IndependentReno Jean Daret III3,9540.19
IndependentAlexander “Xan” John2,8130.14
Total votes2,071,543 100.00
Republican hold

See also

References

  1. ^ “Dr. William M. Cassidy, Gastroenterologist in Baton Rouge, LA”. US News.
  2. ^ a b Mena, Kelly; Merica, Dan (February 13, 2021). “Louisiana Republican Party censures Cassidy following vote to convict Trump”. CNN. Cable News Network. Retrieved February 14, 2021.
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  4. ^ “CASSIDY, Bill profile at”. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved March 28, 2014.
  5. ^ Murphy, Paul (December 5, 2014). “Bill Cassidy’s employment at LSU scrutinized”. WWL. Archived from the original on April 17, 2016. Retrieved April 6, 2016.
  6. ^ Anderson, Laurie Smith. “Program offers health care for adults without insurance.” Baton Rouge Morning Advocate, May 24, 2002, Metro Edition, p. 1C.
  7. ^ “Congressman Cassidy Celebrates $500,000 Federal Grant With Ribbon Cutting at Westdale Middle School’s Health Center”. East Baton Rouge Parish School System. October 26, 2012. Archived from the original on January 18, 2013. Retrieved July 14, 2014.
  8. ^ “Viral Hepatitis – The Secret Epidemic”. US Government Printing Office. June 17, 2010. Retrieved July 14, 2014.
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  10. ^ Gibson, Ginger (November 3, 2013). “Bill Cassidy tries to unite Louisiana conservatives”. Politico. Retrieved January 5, 2015.
  11. ^ a b “Cassidy once donated to his rival”. The Advocate. September 20, 2013. Archived from the original on May 31, 2014. Retrieved May 31, 2014.
  12. ^ Joseph, Cameron (September 19, 2013). “Cassidy donated to Landrieu’s first reelection”. The Hill. Retrieved May 31, 2014.
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  17. ^ Chatelain, Kim (November 6, 2012). “U.S. Rep. Bill Cassidy cruises to re-election”. The Times-Picayune. Retrieved September 15, 2014.
  18. ^ Cassidy, Bill (July 16, 2009). “Earmarks should require an itemized receipt”. Huffington Post. Retrieved April 29, 2014.
  19. ^ “H.R. 5519 (111th)”. GovTrack.us. Retrieved September 17, 2013.
  20. ^ Restuccia, Andrew (August 19, 2010). “In Louisiana, Candidates Fight For – And Over – Oil Jobs”. The Washington Independent. Retrieved April 29, 2014.
  21. ^ Blum, Jordan (August 23, 2013). “Congressmen spar over BP money”. The Advocate. Archived from the original on October 23, 2014. Retrieved April 29, 2014.
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  25. ^ Kasperowicz, Pete (July 24, 2013). “Energy bills advance with House vote”. The Hill. Retrieved July 26, 2013.
  26. ^ Gross, Charles (June 19, 2013). “Senators Carper, Murkowski, Representatives Cassidy, Kind Introduce Bill to Help Reduce Obesity”. Benzinga. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  27. ^ Everett, Burgess (June 12, 2014). “Abortion becomes issue in Louisiana Senate race”. POLITICO. Retrieved October 10, 2014.
  28. ^ Klein, Rebecca (July 12, 2013). “Rep. Mark Takano Corrects Republican Letter, Proves He Will Always Be A Teacher”. The Huffington Post. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  29. ^ Alpert, Bruce (March 12, 2014). “Will flood insurance bill get a vote this week?”. The Times-Picayune. Retrieved April 29, 2014.
  30. ^ Blum, Jordan (May 17, 2013). “Cassidy blasts Obamacare”. The Advocate. Archived from the original on May 2, 2014. Retrieved April 29, 2014.
  31. ^ Marcos, Cristina (September 11, 2014). “House ok’s Cassidy’s ‘keep your plan’ bill”. The Hill.
  32. ^ Ornstein, Charles (March 22, 2017). “We Fact-Checked Lawmakers’ Letters to Constituents on Health Care”. ProPublica. Retrieved March 22, 2017.
  33. ^ “CBO – H.R. 4899” (PDF). Congressional Budget Office. Retrieved June 26, 2014.
  34. ^ Marcos, Cristina (June 26, 2014). “House passes bill to increase offshore energy projects”. The Hill. Retrieved June 26, 2014.
  35. ^ Graeber, Daniel J. (June 27, 2014). “House measure on gas aimed at lower prices”. UPI. Retrieved January 5, 2015.
  36. ^ Alpert, Bruce (June 26, 2014). “House passes bill to expand production and drop cap on sharing”. The Times-Picayune. Retrieved June 27, 2014.
  37. ^ “Committee Assignments | Congressman Bill Cassidy”. Cassidy.house.gov. Archived from the original on August 15, 2014. Retrieved August 18, 2014.
  38. ^ “Caucus Memberships | Congressman Bill Cassidy”. Cassidy.house.gov. Archived from the original on August 15, 2014. Retrieved August 18, 2014.
  39. ^ Barrow, Bill (December 4, 2014). “La.’s Cassidy: What kind of senator would he be?”. AP News. Retrieved February 7, 2021.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  40. ^ Deslatte, Melinda (August 24, 2013). “Bill Cassidy’s ability to oust Mary Landrieu questioned”. Shreveport Times. Retrieved September 20, 2013.
  41. ^ Philip Bump (December 7, 2014). “Mary Landrieu’s seat will be held by a Republican for the first time in 132 years”. Washington Post.
  42. ^ Jimmy Kimmel on Response to Emotional Monologue About Baby & Health Care Debate on YouTube
  43. ^ a b c d e Yahr, Emily (September 20, 2017). “Jimmy Kimmel gets heated about health-care bill, says Sen. Bill Cassidy ‘lied right to my face’. The Washington Post. Retrieved September 20, 2017.
  44. ^ a b c Rachel Garfield, Larry Levit, Robin Rudowitz & Gary Claxton, State-by-State Estimates of Changes in Federal Spending on Health Care Under the Graham-Cassidy Bill, Kaiser Family Foundation (September 21, 2017).
  45. ^ Edwin Parks & Matt Broaddus, Cassidy-Graham Plan’s Damaging Cuts to Health Care Funding Would Grow Dramatically in 2027, Center for Budget and Policy Priorities (revised September 20, 2017).
  46. ^ Lauren Fox, The one major reason Graham-Cassidy could pass, CNN (September 21, 2017).
  47. ^ a b Kessler, Glenn (September 21, 2017). “Analysis | Sen. Cassidy’s rebuttal to Jimmy Kimmel: ‘More people will have coverage’. Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved September 21, 2017.
  48. ^ Atoms, Greg. “Senator Bill Cassidy Says Pro-Trump Rioters Committed Sedition”. News Radio 710 KEEL. No. 8 January 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  49. ^ Bridges, Tyler (January 9, 2021). “GOP leaders in Louisiana with Trump even as other Republicans split with him after the Capitol riot”. The Advocate. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  50. ^ “The Latest: Senate acquits Trump of inciting Capitol attack”. AP News. Associated Press. February 13, 2021. Retrieved February 13, 2021. Voting to find Trump guilty were GOP Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska, Patrick Toomey of Pennsylvania.
  51. ^ “https://twitter.com/senlandrieu/status/1360701649673719816”. Twitter. Retrieved March 26, 2021. {{cite web}}: External link in |title= (help)
  52. ^ Republican senators torpedo Jan. 6 commission, Roll Call, Chris Marquette, May 28, 2021. Retrieved May 29, 2021.
  53. ^ Diaz, Daniella (February 28, 2021). “Cassidy on Trump and the GOP: ‘If we idolize one person, we will lose’. CNN. Retrieved February 28, 2021.
  54. ^ “Sen. Bill Cassidy”. American Conservative Union Foundation. Retrieved May 5, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  55. ^ Galford, Chris (July 2, 2019). “Bipartisan Senate effort seeks to ease regulation of agricultural trucking”. transportationtodaynews.com.
  56. ^ “Marsha Blackburn, David Perdue, Colleagues Encourage Trump Administration to Avoid Another Continuing Resolution”. clarksvilleonline.com. July 6, 2019.
  57. ^ Whitesides, John (2017). “Justice Kennedy on hot seat in major voting rights case”. Reuters. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  58. ^ “Sens. Cruz, Cornyn file Concealed-Carry Reciprocity Bill”. kcbd.com. January 10, 2019.
  59. ^ “Klobuchar bill protecting Gold Star families from Trump tax hike passes Senate”. Brainerd Dispatch. May 23, 2019.
  60. ^ Jagoda, Naomi (July 30, 2019). “Senators offer bipartisan proposal allowing new parents to advance tax credits”. The Hill.
  61. ^ “Cassidy Commends March for Life Activists, Announces Support for Pro-Life Bills” (Press release).
  62. ^ M.D, Bill Cassidy (September 29, 2017). “Today, my wife & I celebrate our 28th wedding anniversary. She’s my best friend & most trusted advisor. I am blessed to share life with her.pic.twitter.com/zTNQj73Zcv”. @billcassidy. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  63. ^ O’Donoghue, Julia. “Bill Cassidy wants to be the doctor he believes the U.S. Senate needs”. Nola.com. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  64. ^ James F. Cassidy obituary, Baton Rouge Morning Advocate, February 24, 2009.
  65. ^ O’Donoghue, Julia (January 22, 2015). “Bill Cassidy’s most trusted political adviser is his wife, Laura”. The Times-Picayune. Retrieved April 6, 2016.
  66. ^ “Senator Bill Cassidy tests positive for coronavirus”. wbrz.com. August 20, 2020. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  67. ^ “State Senator — 16th Senatorial District”. Louisiana Secretary of State. December 9, 2006. Retrieved April 3, 2021.
  68. ^ “State Senator — 16th Senatorial District”. Louisiana Secretary of State. October 20, 2007. Retrieved April 3, 2021.
  69. ^ “U. S. Representative — 6th Congressional District”. Louisiana Secretary of State. November 4, 2008. Retrieved April 3, 2021.
  70. ^ “U. S. Representative — 6th Congressional District”. Louisiana Secretary of State. November 2, 2010. Retrieved April 3, 2021.
  71. ^ “U. S. Representative — 6th Congressional District”. Louisiana Secretary of State. November 6, 2012. Retrieved April 3, 2021.
  72. ^ “U. S. Senator”. Louisiana Secretary of State. November 4, 2014. Retrieved April 3, 2021.
  73. ^ “U. S. Senator”. Louisiana Secretary of State. December 6, 2014. Retrieved April 3, 2021.
  74. ^ “U. S. Senator”. Louisiana Secretary of State. November 3, 2020. Retrieved April 3, 2021.

External links

Louisiana State Senate
Preceded by

Member of the Louisiana Senate
from the 16th district

2006–2009
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Louisiana’s 6th congressional district

2009–2015
Succeeded by

Party political offices
Preceded by

Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Louisiana
(Class 2)

2014, 2020
Most recent
U.S. Senate
Preceded by

U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Louisiana
2015–present
Served alongside: David Vitter, John Neely Kennedy
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

as United States Senator from North Carolina

Order of precedence of the United States
as United States Senator from Louisiana

since January 3, 2015
Succeeded by

as United States Senator from Arkansas

Preceded by

United States senators by seniority
66th
Succeeded by


Recent Elections

2014 US Senator

Bill Cassidy (R)712,37955.9%
Mary Landrieu (D)561,21044.1%
TOTAL1,273,589

Finances

CASSIDY, WILLIAM (BILL) has run in 5 races for public office, winning 4 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $23,429,319.

Source: Follow the Money

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

New Legislation

Source: Congress.gov

Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

Committee on Energy and Commerce

  • Subcommittee on Health
  • Subcommittee on Environment and Economy
  • Subcommittee on Energy and Power

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

Civil Rights

2nd Amendment Rights

The Second Amendment guarantees law-abiding citizens the right to keep and bear arms. I am proud to have an “A” rating from the National Rifle Association (NRA) because I have and will continue to fight for Louisianans rights that are protected by the Constitution.

Economy

Budget

The national debt is more than $22 trillion. As Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Fiscal Responsibility and Economic Growth, I’m making it clear that fiscal responsibility is not an option, but a necessity to ensure the long term financial health of the United States. We must get federal spending under control by cutting wasteful, duplicative programs and ensuring taxpayer dollars are spent wisely. We must also save Medicare and Social Security from bankruptcy so that they are there for Americans who will need them in the future. Taking these steps will help protect our children and grandchildren from mountains of debt they cannot afford.

Education

Education

As a member of the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee, one of my top priorities is ensuring that students have access to quality educations.

Parents and teachers, not federal bureaucrats, make the best education decisions for students.  High standards yield high achievement, and parents should have a right to choose the best educational opportunities for their children. These options include homeschooling, private and parochial schools, charter schools, and public schools.

Environment

Energy and Natural Resources

As chairman of the Senate Energy Subcommittee, I know America’s national and economic security depends on a balanced, comprehensive energy policy. We need to unleash American energy, including cleaner-burning natural gas that has created thousands of good-paying jobs for Louisiana families.

Lowering greenhouse gases is important. Louisiana loses a football field of land every 100 minutes due to erosion and rising sea levels. But we need serious solutions, not bumper sticker slogans. Half-baked ideas like the Green New Deal would evaporate jobs and actually increase global emissions by incentivizing manufacturing to move to high-emitting countries like China.

Louisiana and our country can be an example to the world by showing how we can expand cleaner-burning natural gas to create jobs and lower emissions at the same time.

Health Care

Lowering the Cost of Healthcare

For over 25 years, I worked in Louisiana’s public hospital system as a doctor treating the uninsured and underinsured. I learned that when the patient has the power, outcomes are better. Right now, laws intended to promote innovation and protect patient safety are being used to increase the cost of prescription drugs. I am working with President Trump to increase price transparency, create more competition to lower health care costs and prescription drug prices.

Immigration

Border Security

We have a crisis on our southern border. I am working with President Trump to stop the flow of illegal drugs and human trafficking into our country.

We must also support the brave men and women of Immigration and Customs Enforcement and uphold our immigration laws to ensure those who want to come to the United States do so through proper, legal channels.

Veterans

Veterans

When our service men and women put themselves in harm’s way to defend our lives, our freedoms, we must commit to giving them the care and treatment they deserve when they return home.

We must honor this commitment by ensuring that the health care, benefits, and services promised to our veterans are fully funded and provide the quality of care they deserve. As a member of the Senate Veteran’s Affairs Committee, this is my priority.

If you are a veteran or military family in need of assistance obtaining these benefits, please call my office with any questions.

Life & Family Values

Faith and religion have played a vital role in our nation’s history. Our Founders’ vision was for America to be a place where individuals could practice their religion and express their beliefs freely and openly. It is important that this right is recognized and respected.

 

This includes protecting the unborn. I am proud to have an “A” from the National Right to Life Committee. As a father of three children, I strongly believe in the right to life. I have and will continue to support pro-life legislation.

Paid Family Leave

As the chairman of the bipartisan Senate Finance Committee working group on paid family leave, I am leading efforts to create a policy that gives parents the flexibility to pursue a career and raise a family. This policy must be fiscally sustainable and not bury taxpayers in even more red ink. We will find a bipartisan solution that empowers families and business owners to succeed.

Taking on Dyslexia

As defined in Section 3635 of the First Step Act: “The term dyslexia means an unexpected difficulty in reading for an individual who has the intelligence to be a much better reader, most commonly caused by a difficulty in the phonological processing (the appreciation of the individual sounds of spoken language), which affects the ability of an individual to speak, read, and spell.”

Dyslexia is an issue that is very important to me, both as a parent of a dyslexic child and as a Senator. According to NIH sponsored research, nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population has dyslexia. Dyslexia is unexpected because these bright children struggle to learn to read and write. We must ensure that our federal education policies provide appropriate screening in kindergarten and first grade and an evidence-based education that will help our students with dyslexia succeed.

We must also recognize the role illiteracy plays in our prison incarceration and recidivism rates. Since dyslexia is the overwhelming reason people are illiterate, The First Step Act, which President Trump signed into law, included my provision to screen inmates for dyslexia so they can receive the assistance they need to learn to read, reenter society and break the cycle of incarceration.

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