Troy CarterTroy Carter – LA2

Current Position: US Representative for LA 2nd District since 2021
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2016 – 2021; New Orleans City Council from 1994 – 2002; State Delegate from 1992 – 1994

Featured Quote: 
Voting rights are the bedrock of American democracy—and they’re currently under assault. Today, I was honored to stand with @BlackVotersMtr, @RepAlGreen, @RepHankJohnson, @RepTroyCarter @RepBowma, @JacksonLeeTX18, and more as we called on the Senate to #ProtectOurVotingRights.

Featured Video: 
Troy Carter for Congress – Lessons From My Mother

Members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) met with senior White House officials on Wednesday and called for the suspension of border patrol agents photographed on horseback rounding up Haitian migrants near the southern border town of Del Rio, Texas.

CBC Chairwoman Joyce Beatty (D-Ohio) told reporters after the meeting at the White House with senior adviser and former CBC member Cedric Richmond and domestic policy adviser and former ambassador Susan Rice that the group immediately highlighted the now-viral pictures that to many observers looked like they were from another era.

“We were very concerned, as we looked at the process, we want those [agents] that were identified suspended; we want to halt that process,” Beatty said.

“The nation saw that,” Beatty added. “There is no one who has contacted me that did not feel that this was not horrific. It’s deplorable, it’s insulting, it makes me too emotional to even talk about that you would treat people like that.”

Beatty was joined at the White House by Reps. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas), Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), Gregory Meeks (D-N.Y.), Troy Carter (D-La.), Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.), Yvette Clark (D-N.Y.), Ritchie Torres (D-N.Y.) and Steven Horsford (D-Nev.).

Beatty also noted that caucus members Reps. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) and Gregory Meeks (D-N.Y.) — chairs of the House Homeland Security Committee and the House Foreign Affairs Committee, respectively — were sending a letter to the administration on the issue.

The letter asks the Department of Homeland Security and the State Department to supply the committees with a laundry list of documents regarding the situation by Oct. 1.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for LA 2nd District since 2021
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2016 – 2021; New Orleans City Council from 1994 – 2002; State Delegate from 1992 – 1994

Featured Quote: 
Voting rights are the bedrock of American democracy—and they’re currently under assault. Today, I was honored to stand with @BlackVotersMtr, @RepAlGreen, @RepHankJohnson, @RepTroyCarter @RepBowma, @JacksonLeeTX18, and more as we called on the Senate to #ProtectOurVotingRights.

Featured Video: 
Troy Carter for Congress – Lessons From My Mother

News

Members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) met with senior White House officials on Wednesday and called for the suspension of border patrol agents photographed on horseback rounding up Haitian migrants near the southern border town of Del Rio, Texas.

CBC Chairwoman Joyce Beatty (D-Ohio) told reporters after the meeting at the White House with senior adviser and former CBC member Cedric Richmond and domestic policy adviser and former ambassador Susan Rice that the group immediately highlighted the now-viral pictures that to many observers looked like they were from another era.

“We were very concerned, as we looked at the process, we want those [agents] that were identified suspended; we want to halt that process,” Beatty said.

“The nation saw that,” Beatty added. “There is no one who has contacted me that did not feel that this was not horrific. It’s deplorable, it’s insulting, it makes me too emotional to even talk about that you would treat people like that.”

Beatty was joined at the White House by Reps. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas), Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), Gregory Meeks (D-N.Y.), Troy Carter (D-La.), Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.), Yvette Clark (D-N.Y.), Ritchie Torres (D-N.Y.) and Steven Horsford (D-Nev.).

Beatty also noted that caucus members Reps. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) and Gregory Meeks (D-N.Y.) — chairs of the House Homeland Security Committee and the House Foreign Affairs Committee, respectively — were sending a letter to the administration on the issue.

The letter asks the Department of Homeland Security and the State Department to supply the committees with a laundry list of documents regarding the situation by Oct. 1.

Twitter

About

Troy Carter 1

Source: Government page

The Honorable Troy A. Carter, Sr. is serving in his first term as the Congressman from Louisiana’s 2nd Congressional District, encompassing most of New Orleans East & West Bank, Jefferson Parish, and River Parishes including St Charles, St. James, St John the Baptist, Ascension, Assumption, Iberville, as well as portions of East Baton Rouge and West Baton Rouge Parish.

Congressman Carter currently serves on two House Committees, the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, one of the largest committees in Congress that has jurisdiction over all modes of transportation, and the Small Business Committee, which has direct oversight and consideration over all matters affecting America’s backbone, small businesses.

The youngest of six children, Congressman Carter was raised in Algiers. He is a product of Orleans Parish Public Schools and went on to graduate from Xavier University, earning a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Business Administration. Additionally, Congressman Carter earned his MBA graduating Summa Cum Laude from Holy Cross University.

Soon after graduating from Xavier University, Congressman Carter served for six years as the Executive Assistant to Mayor Sidney Barthelemy. In 1991, Congressman Carter became the first African American to be elected to the Louisiana House of Representatives from the 102nd District in Algiers, where he served as the youngest ever floor leader representing the City of New Orleans.

In 1994, Congressman Carter was elected to the New Orleans City Council, representing District ‘C’, which includes Algiers, and the historic French Quarter, again becoming the first African American elected to the position. After a hiatus from public office, Congressman Carter was elected to the State Senate for Louisiana’s 7th District, where he served as the Senate Minority Leader for the Democratic Caucus. During his time as a Legislator, Congressman Carter authored and co-sponsored hundreds of bills.

As a Louisiana Legislator, Congressman Carter championed large-scale infrastructure projects, economic development, and efforts to decrease homelessness drastically. He has also worked as a staunch advocate for criminal justice reform, women’s health care, and civil rights and equality on behalf of the LGBTQI community. As Congressman, he actively continues his work to address the issues above and several others, including COVID-19 relief for individuals and small businesses, environmental justice reform, and reducing student debt.

Congressman Carter is a proud husband to wife, Brigadier General Andreé Navarro-Carter of the United States Army, and father to sons Troy Jr. and Joshua. They live on the Westbank of New Orleans, where Congressman Carter was born and raised.

The Honorable Congressman Troy A. Carter, Sr.  has enjoyed a series of historic 1sts including:

• 1st African American elected to the Louisiana State House from District 102

• 1st African American elected to the New Orleans City Council representing District C

• 1st African American elected to the Louisiana State Senate from District 7

• 1st Congressman elected to Louisiana’s 2nd Congressional District from the Westbank

• 1st Congressman whose spouse is a General Officer in the United States Army

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

  • Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure
  • Committee on Small Business

Offices

506 Cannon House Office Building

Washington, DC  20515

Phone: (202) 225-6636
3401 General DeGaulle Drive, Suite 100

New Orleans, LA  70114

Phone: (504) 381-3970
Southern University at New Orleans
6803 Press Drive, Suite 160

New Orleans, LA  70126

T.H. Harris Hall
801 Harding Boulevard

Baton Rouge, LA  70807

Phone: (225) 726-2070
Gretna Courthouse
200 Derbigny Street, Suite 3200

Gretna, LA  70053

Phone: (504) 381-3999
River Parishes Community College
181 Regala Park Road

Reserve, LA  70084

650 Poydras Street, Suite 2435

New Orleans, LA  70130

Phone: (504) 228-3777

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Troy Anthony Carter (born October 26, 1963) is an American politician serving as the U.S. representative for Louisiana’s 2nd congressional district since 2021.[1][2] He was previously member of the Louisiana State Senate for the 7th district. A member of the Democratic Party, Carter also previously served on the New Orleans City Council and as a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives.

Early life and education

Carter was born in New Orleans.[3] After graduating from Oliver Perry Walker High School in Algiers, Carter attended Xavier University of Louisiana, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration and political science. He has completed programs at the Harvard Kennedy School and Carnegie Mellon University‘s School of Urban and Public Affairs.[4]

Early career

Carter at the 1996 French Quarter Festival

Carter has been an adjunct political science instructor at Xavier University of Louisiana.[5] Prior to his election to the state legislature, Carter served six years as executive assistant to New Orleans mayor Sidney Barthelemy.[6]

Carter was elected as a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives in 1991, becoming the first African-American to serve District 102 in the Louisiana House.[7] As a state representative in 1993, Carter introduced legislation in the state legislature to prohibit discrimination against LGBTQ individuals. After his election to the Louisiana Senate, he filed similar legislation in 2017 and 2020.[8]

In 1994, he was elected to represent District C in the New Orleans City Council. He served until 2002, when he unsuccessfully sought the office of mayor. Carter was eliminated in the 2002 primary election by Ray Nagin and Richard Pennington. He was an unsuccessful candidate for Louisiana’s 2nd congressional district seat in 2006 against then-incumbent William J. Jefferson.[9][10]

After several years out of public office, Carter was elected to the Louisiana Senate in 2015.[6] Carter received 12,935 votes (56.8 percent) in the 2015 runoff election to Jeff Arnold‘s 9,852 (43.2 percent).[11] Carter authored or co-sponsored seventy-five bills that went on to become law.[7] While also serving as chair of the Louisiana Senate Democratic Caucus, Carter is chairman of the Senate’s Labor and Industrial Relations Committee.[12]

Carter serves as chairman of the Algiers Development District.[7]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

On November 18, 2020, U.S. Representative Cedric Richmond announced that he would resign from Louisiana’s 2nd congressional district in January 2021 after having been selected by President-elect Joe Biden to be Senior Advisor to the President and the administration’s director of the Office of Public Liaison. Carter then ran to fill the seat in Congress in the special election.[13][14] On March 20, 2021, Carter finished first in the top-two primary and advanced, with runner-up Senator Karen Carter Peterson, to the runoff election that was held on April 24, 2021.[15]

Carter received endorsements from Cedric Richmond,[16] John Breaux,[17] 8 congressional Democrats,[18] Helena Moreno,[18] Cleo Fields, Sharon Weston Broome,[19] AFL–CIO,[18] the Louisiana Democratic Party,[18] The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate,[18] The Louisiana Weekly,[20] and Gambit.[18]

In the April 24 runoff, Carter received 48,511 votes (55.2 percent) to Peterson’s 39,295 (44.8 percent), with 87,806 votes reported from 100% of precincts.[21]

He was sworn in as the U.S. Representative for Louisiana’s 2nd congressional district on May 11, 2021, increasing the Democratic Party’s majority to 219-212 over the Republican Party in the United States House of Representatives.[2]

Committee assignments

Political positions

Carter with President Biden surveying damage from Hurricane Ida

Carter is against conservative measures that have sought to restrict abortion and expand gun rights.[23] During his term of office as a state senator, he had two priorities: raising the state’s minimum wage and strengthening anti-discrimination laws against the LGBTQ+ community.[23] He supports the infrastructure policy of the Biden administration.[23]

Personal life

Carter’s wife Andreé serves in the United States Army and he has two sons, Troy Jr. and Joshua. He and his family live on the Westbank of New Orleans, where Carter was born and raised.[24]

See also

References

  1. ^ Deslatte, Melinda (April 24, 2021). “Democrat Troy Carter wins New Orleans-based US House seat”. Associated Press. Retrieved April 24, 2021.
  2. ^ a b WDSU Digital Team (May 11, 2021). “Troy Carter sworn in to Congress”. WDSU.
  3. ^ “Councilman Troy A. Carter Records”. archives.nolalibrary.org. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  4. ^ “Louisiana State Senate – Troy Carter’s Biography”. senate.la.gov. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  5. ^ “Downtown NOLA – Downtown Development District”. Downtown New Orleans. April 8, 2014. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  6. ^ a b “Senator Troy Carter – District 7”. Louisiana State Senate. Retrieved March 15, 2021.
  7. ^ a b c “Senator Troy A. Carter (Chairman)”. Algiers Development District. Retrieved March 15, 2021.
  8. ^ Westwood, Rosemary (June 16, 2020). “What The Supreme Court LGBTQ Rights Decision Means For Louisiana”. New Orleans Public Radio. Retrieved March 15, 2021.
  9. ^ “Troy Carter’s 2006 campaign bio” Archived September 19, 2008, at the Wayback Machine (accessed 2009 June 08).
  10. ^ “Troy Carter”. Ballotpedia. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  11. ^ “Results for Election Date: 11/21/2015”. Louisiana Secretary of State. Retrieved November 28, 2015.
  12. ^ “Labor and Industrial Relations Committee”. Louisiana State Senate. Retrieved March 15, 2021.
  13. ^ Murphy, Paul (November 16, 2020). “Cedric Richmond will be Senior Advisor to the President; to resign House seat before inauguration”. WWL-TV. Retrieved November 18, 2020.
  14. ^ Greg Hilburn [@GregHilburn1] (November 18, 2020). “Democratic State Sen. Troy Carter tells me he will ‘absolutely’ run for outgoing Congressman @RepRichmond’s seat and hopes to have his support @TROYSEE #lalege #lagov” (Tweet). Retrieved November 18, 2020 – via Twitter.
  15. ^ Troy Carter, Ballotpedia. Retrieved March 26, 2021.
  16. ^ Team, WDSU Digital (January 18, 2021). “Cedric Richmond endorses Troy Carter for Congress”. WDSU. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  17. ^ “Browse Receipts”. FEC.gov. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  18. ^ a b c d e f “Louisiana’s 2nd Congressional District special election, 2021”. Ballotpedia. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  19. ^ Rosato, Chris. “Mayor Sharon Weston Broome endorses Troy Carter for Louisiana’s 2nd Congressional district”. WAFB. Retrieved April 16, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  20. ^ “Recommendations for March 20 Special Election”. The Louisiana Weekly. Retrieved April 16, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  21. ^ Louisiana 2nd District U.S. House special election results, Washington Post, April 25, 2021.
  22. ^ “Committees and Caucuses”. troycarter.house.gov. January 3, 2021. Retrieved July 1, 2021.
  23. ^ a b c Bridges, Tyler. “A look at Troy Carter’s time in the Senate: Issues he’s supported, who has endorsed him”. The Advocate. Retrieved April 20, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  24. ^ “About”. January 3, 2021.

External links

Louisiana House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the Louisiana House of Representatives
from the 102nd district

1992–1994
Succeeded by

Political offices
Preceded by

Member of the New Orleans City Council
from the C district

1994–2002
Succeeded by

Louisiana State Senate
Preceded by

Member of the Louisiana Senate
from the 7th district

2016–2021
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Minority Leader of the Louisiana Senate
2016–2021
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Louisiana’s 2nd congressional district

2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
424th
Succeeded by


Issues

Committees

House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee

The House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, one of the largest committees in Congress, has jurisdiction over all modes of transportation: aviation, maritime and waterborne transportation, highways, bridges, mass transit, and railroads.

Congressman Carter serves on theEconomic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Subcommittee andRailroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials Subcommittee.

  • The Transportation and Infrastructure Committee also has jurisdiction over other aspects of our national infrastructure, such as clean water and wastewater management, flood damage reduction, the management of federally owned real estate and public buildings, the development of economically depressed rural and urban areas, disaster preparedness and response and hazardous materials transportation.

House Small Business Committee

The House Small Business Committee has jurisdiction over American enterprise and entrepreneurship.

Congressman Carter serves on theUnderserved, Agricultural, and Rural Business Development Subcommittee and the Contracting and Infrastructure Subcommittee.

Legislation

Learn more about legislation sponsored and co-sponsored by Representative Carter.

Issues

 

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Cedric RichmondCedric Richmond

Current Position: US Representative for LA District 2 since 2011
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 US Senator

As a member of the Committee on Homeland Security, Congressman Richmond works to ensure New Orleans and surrounding communities are adequately prepared for any emergency through oversight of the Federal Emergency Management Association (FEMA). He also works to ensure the security of the nation’s critical infrastructure, borders, and ports. He is also the Chairman of the Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Innovation Subcommittee.

As a member of the Committee on the Judiciary, the second oldest standing committee in Congress, Congressman Richmond works with committee members to exercise oversight responsibility for the U.S. Departments of Justice and Homeland Security.

Source: Government page

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for LA District 2 since 2011
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 US Senator

As a member of the Committee on Homeland Security, Congressman Richmond works to ensure New Orleans and surrounding communities are adequately prepared for any emergency through oversight of the Federal Emergency Management Association (FEMA). He also works to ensure the security of the nation’s critical infrastructure, borders, and ports. He is also the Chairman of the Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Innovation Subcommittee.

As a member of the Committee on the Judiciary, the second oldest standing committee in Congress, Congressman Richmond works with committee members to exercise oversight responsibility for the U.S. Departments of Justice and Homeland Security.

Source: Government page

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