Steve ScaliseSteve Scalise – LA1

Current Position: US Representative for LA District 1 since 2008
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 1996 – 2008

Other Postions:
House Minority Whip
Ranking Member, Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis

Featured Quote: 
Think about this: If you’re a vaccinated American citizen not wearing a mask in the Capitol, Pelosi will have you arrested. But if you’re a COVID-positive illegal immigrant at the border? Dems welcome you and put you on a plane to an American city. Outrageous double standard.

Featured Video: 
Newsmax | House Republican Whip Steve Scalise with Eric Bolling

 

WASHINGTON, D.C.— Today, House Republican Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) and Congressman Garret Graves (R-La.) wrote a letter to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland urging the Interior Department to expedite resumption of offshore energy production in the aftermath of Hurricane Ida to prevent gas prices from skyrocketing across the country and reduce America’s dependence on foreign oil production.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for LA District 1 since 2008
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 1996 – 2008

Other Postions:
House Minority Whip
Ranking Member, Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis

Featured Quote: 
Think about this: If you’re a vaccinated American citizen not wearing a mask in the Capitol, Pelosi will have you arrested. But if you’re a COVID-positive illegal immigrant at the border? Dems welcome you and put you on a plane to an American city. Outrageous double standard.

Featured Video: 
Newsmax | House Republican Whip Steve Scalise with Eric Bolling

 

News

WASHINGTON, D.C.— Today, House Republican Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) and Congressman Garret Graves (R-La.) wrote a letter to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland urging the Interior Department to expedite resumption of offshore energy production in the aftermath of Hurricane Ida to prevent gas prices from skyrocketing across the country and reduce America’s dependence on foreign oil production.

Twitter

About

Source: Government page

Steve Scalise proudly represents the First Congressional District of Louisiana, stretching from the beautiful Northshore of Lake Pontchartrain and the culturally distinct New Orleans suburbs to the vibrant bayous and wetlands abundant in natural resources. He was elected to Congress in 2008 after serving in the Louisiana State Legislature from 1996-2008. He serves his colleagues as the House Republican Whip, the second highest position in House Republican leadership.

Scalise is a strong leader who upholds the Constitution, advocating for the principles of fiscal discipline, lower taxes, a robust national defense, and conservative values.

From the House repeal of Obamacare, to the reauthorization of the National Flood Insurance Program, to the largest pay increase for our troops in nearly a decade, to the historic passage and enactment of the historic Tax Cuts and Jobs Act – Scalise is focused on issues that affect Americans the most.

Scalise knows the importance of energy development to Louisiana, and the necessity to achieve American energy dominance. As a senior member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Scalise fights to enact a national energy strategy that increases the supply of American energy through enhanced production and technological innovation to lower prices at the pump and reduce our dependence on Middle Eastern oil.

Scalise is effective at working with Republican and Democrat colleagues to pass legislation on issues important to Louisiana. A steadfast defender of Louisiana’s coast, Scalise led the effort in the House to pass the RESTORE Act, which was signed into law in July 2012. The RESTORE Act dedicated the vast majority of Clean Water Act fines from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill to coastal restoration. This legislation is widely regarded as the single most significant action taken to restore Louisiana’s coast. Whip Scalise also is a strong supporter of revenue sharing and leads the fight in Washington to protect Louisiana’s GOMESA funding, ensuring that Louisiana has access to the hundreds of millions of dollars dedicated to restoring our coast.

Critically wounded at a Congressional baseball practice on June 14, 2017, Scalise was saved by a heroic response from U.S. Capitol Police Special Agents and Alexandria Police Officers. Scalise fought for his life and returned to Congress, inspiring the nation with his resilience and optimism. Throughout his recovery, he was moved by the outpouring of prayers and support he and his family received from the American people.

A native of Jefferson Parish, Scalise graduated from Archbishop Rummel High School and Louisiana State University, where he earned a degree in Computer Science and a minor in Political Science. Scalise and his wife, Jennifer, have two children, Madison and Harrison

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses

  • Republican Study Committee
  • Shellfish Caucus, Co-Chair
  • House Pro-Life Caucus
  • Sugar Caucus
  • Long Range Strike Caucus
  • House Republican Israel Caucus
  • Congressional Dairy Farmers Caucus
  • Kidney Caucus
  • Cancer Caucus
  • Diabetes Caucus
  • Second Amendment Task Force
  • Congressional Sportsmans Caucus
  • House Shipbuilding Caucus
  • Values Action Team
  • Recording Arts and Sciences Caucus

Offices

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

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VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

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Wikipedia Entry

Stephen Joseph Scalise (/skəˈls/; born October 6, 1965)[1] is an American politician who is the United States House of Representatives minority whip and representative for Louisiana’s 1st congressional district, serving since 2008. The district includes most of New Orleans‘s suburbs, such as Metarie, Kenner, and Slidell, as well as a portion of New Orleans itself. He is a member of the Republican Party[2][3] and was the chair of the conservative House Republican Study Committee.[4]

Before his election to Congress, Scalise served four months in the Louisiana State Senate and twelve years in the Louisiana House of Representatives. On June 19, 2014, Scalise’s Republican colleagues elected him majority whip of the United States House of Representatives. He assumed office on August 1. He is the first Louisianian to serve as majority whip since Hale Boggs of Louisiana’s 2nd congressional district held the position from 1962 to 1971. In 2017, Scalise became the dean of the Louisiana congressional delegation upon Senator David Vitter‘s retirement.

On June 14, 2017, during practice for the Congressional Baseball Game, Scalise was shot and seriously wounded by a left-wing domestic terrorist[5][6] who was targeting Republicans.[7] He underwent treatment for several months, returning to Congress on September 28.

After Joe Biden won the 2020 presidential election, Scalise supported Donald Trump‘s position by falsely denying Biden’s victory and participating in efforts to overturn the results. As of March 2022, Scalise still refuses to acknowledge that Biden won the election legitimately.[8][9][10][11][12]

Early life and education

Scalise was born in New Orleans,[13] one of three children of Alfred Joseph Scalise, a real estate broker who died on October 8, 2015, at the age of 77, and the former Carol Schilleci. His siblings are Glenn and Tara Scalise.[14]

Scalise’s great-grandparents immigrated to the United States from Italy in the late 1800s.[15] He graduated from Archbishop Rummel High School in Metairie in Jefferson Parish[16] and earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge with a major in computer science and a minor in political science.[17][18] At Louisiana State University, Scalise was a member of the Acacia Fraternity.[19] He serves on the board of the American Italian Renaissance Foundation, servicing the American Italian Cultural Center.

Louisiana Legislature

Republican (formerly Democratic) State Representative Quentin Dastugue made an unsuccessful bid for Governor of Louisiana in 1995, dropping out before the nonpartisan blanket primary. Scalise was recruited by state Republicans to run for Dastugue’s District 82 seat in the Louisiana House of Representatives, winning his election bid.[20] Scalise was re-elected to the seat in 1999 and 2003, serving until 2007.[21]
His legislative peers named him to the House Appropriations Committee as the representative of the First Congressional District. Scalise opposed the 2002 , a proposal by Lake Charles Representative Vic Stelly, since enacted and then repealed, to reduce certain state sales taxes on food for home consumption and utilities in exchange for higher state income taxes.[citation needed]

Scalise was elected in the October 20, 2007 nonpartisan blanket primary to the District 9 seat in the Louisiana Senate vacated by the term-limited of Metairie. Scalise received 19,154 votes (61 percent) in a three-way contest. Fellow Republican , an education professor at the University of New Orleans who subsequently won a special state House election in 2016, polled 8,948 votes (29 percent). A Democrat, David Gereighty, polled 3,154 votes (10 percent) in the heavily Republican-oriented district.[22] Scalise, who was term-limited out of the House, was succeeded in the state House by his aide, Cameron Henry of Metairie.

In the special election on November 4, 2008, to fill the remaining three and one-half years in Scalise’s state Senate term, defeated Polly Thomas, 21,853 (52.1 percent) to 20,065 (47.9 percent). Thomas had also lost the race for the seat in 2007 to Scalise.[23]

U.S. House of Representatives

Scalise with President George W. Bush in 2008

Scalise with President Donald Trump in 2018

Elections

2008 special election

In 2004, Scalise announced that he would run for the 1st congressional district, but deferred to the preference of party leaders and supported Bobby Jindal, who won the position vacated by the successful U.S. senatorial candidate, David Vitter.

In 2007, when Jindal was elected to the governorship of Louisiana, Scalise announced his intentions to seek the House seat again. This time he received Republican party backing.

Scalise’s main opponent in the Republican primary–the real contest in this heavily Republican district–was fellow state representative State Representative from Mandeville in St. Tammany Parish. Burns accused Scalise of push polling, a practice in which a campaign contacts voters by telephone and asks probing questions which leave a negative impression of his opponent. Scalise defended his poll from criticism by Burns: “We were running a public opinion survey this week conducted by the largest Republican polling firm in the country, Public Opinion Strategies. . . . conducted with a sample of 300 people, and it shows Scalise at 57 percent, Burns at 26 percent and undecided at 17 percent The margin of error is 5.6 percent. We ran a fact-based public opinion survey, not a push poll.”[24]

In the March 8, 2008, Republican primary, Scalise polled 16,799 votes (48 percent). He went on to win the runoff election on April 5 against Burns, who received 9,631 votes (28 percent) in the initial primary.[25][26]

In the May 3 general election, Scalise received 33,867 votes (75.13 percent) to Democrat Gilda Reed’s 10,142 ballots (22.5 percent). Two minor candidates polled the remaining 2.36 percent of the vote. Reed was a favorite of organized labor and the Democratic constituency groups. The First District has been Republican since 1977, when Bob Livingston won a special election.[27]

Scalise was sworn in on May 7, 2008.[28]

2008 general election

In the regularly scheduled election, Scalise was reelected over Democrat Jim Harlan, 66 percent to 34 percent.[29]

2010

Scalise defeated the Democratic nominee, Myron Katz, and an Independent, Arden Wells, in his 2010 bid for reelection.[30]

2012

In June 2009, Scalise joined Dan Kyle, the former legislative auditor and the treasurer of the Louisiana GOP, as directors of a national presidential fund-raising effort promoting Governor Jindal. According to Kyle, the group hoped to raise $60 million to persuade Jindal to seek the 2012 party nomination.[31] Others on the committee include former State Representative Woody Jenkins. Former Republican State Senator Tom Schedler of Slidell had his name removed from the group, not because he opposes Jindal but because such fund-raising activity could conflict with Schedler’s role at the time as first assistant to Louisiana Secretary of State Jay Dardenne.[31] In 2010, Schedler succeeded Dardenne as secretary of state.

In his own 2012 congressional race, Scalise prevailed with 193,490 votes (66.6 percent) over four opponents, the strongest of whom was the Democrat M. V. “Vinny” Mendoza, who finished with 61,979 votes (21.3 percent). A second Republican, Gary King, received 24,838 votes (8.6 percent). Independent Arden Wells ran again and received 4,285 votes (1.5 percent) in his second race against Scalise.[32]

House Minority Whip

The Republicans lost their majority in the 2018 House of Representatives elections, and Scalise was elected as House Minority Whip, with Kevin McCarthy of California as Minority Leader. While as Majority Whip he was the third-ranking House Republican behind Speaker Paul Ryan and McCarthy, as Minority Whip he is second in command behind McCarthy.[33]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Tenure

In 2011, Scalise became a co-sponsor of Bill H.R. 3261, otherwise known as the Stop Online Piracy Act (withdrawn January 23, 2012).[37] As chairman of the Republican Study Committee, Scalise dismissed Derek Khanna, a committee staffer, in December 2012 because of pressure from content industry lobbyists after the study committee published a memo advocating copyright reform.[38]

In 2013, Scalise voted against reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act.[39] Also in 2013, Scalise sponsored a bill called the FCC Consolidated Reporting Act. The bill makes the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) consolidate several of their reports into one report.[40]

In December 2017, Scalise voted in favor of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.[41] Scalise says that the bill will “put more money in the pockets of hard-working families.”[42]

Scalise was the ranking Republican on the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis during the May 19, 2021, hearings involving Emergent BioSolutions founder Faud El-Hibiri and its CEO Robert G. Kramer.[43][44][45][46][47][48][49]

On January 6, 2021, Scalise voted to de-certify President-elect Biden’s victories in Arizona and Pennsylvania.[50][51]

Leadership race

In the aftermath of Rep. Eric Cantor‘s unexpected defeat by Dave Brat on June 10, 2014, Scalise launched a campaign to replace Rep. Kevin McCarthy in the position of Majority Whip of the House; McCarthy himself would replace Cantor as House Majority Leader. Scalise’s ascent to leadership built on his “come-from-behind win in 2012 to become chairman” of the Republican Study Committee.[52] Scalise subsequently won a three-way race for whip, winning on the first ballot despite the efforts of fellow candidates Peter Roskam and Marlin Stutzman.[53][54] He came under fire for using the assistance of a federal lobbyist, John Feehery, when hiring staff for the Majority Leader’s Press Office.[55]

Political positions

Environment

Scalise rejects the scientific consensus on climate change.[56][57] He has on multiple occasions falsely claimed that the scientific community used to accept notions of global cooling.[56][58]

Health care

Scalise opposes the Affordable Care Act. Scalise applauded a Texas district court ruling the Affordable Care Act was unconstitutional in its entirety.[59]

Gun law

Scalise has been an opponent of gun control and was given an “A+ rating” from the National Rifle Association.[60][61] After being shot, and in the wake of the 2017 Las Vegas shooting, Scalise said on Meet the Press that he is still a gun rights supporter: “Don’t try to put new laws in place that don’t fix these problems. They only make it harder for law-abiding citizens to own a gun.” Scalise has described the Second Amendment as “unlimited”.[62]

In 2018, Scalise co-sponsored a bill to “strengthen school safety and security”, which required a two-thirds vote for passage given that it was brought up under an expedited process known as Suspension of the Rules. The House voted 407–10 to approve the bill, which would “provide $50 million a year for a new federal grant program to train students, teachers and law enforcement on how to spot and report signs of gun violence”. Named STOP (Students, Teachers, and Officers Preventing) School Violence Act, it would “develop anonymous telephone and online systems where people could report threats of violence.” At the same time, it would authorize $25 million for schools to improve and harden their security, such as installing new locks, lights, metal detectors and panic buttons. A separate spending bill would be required to provide money for the grant program.[63]

Immigration

Scalise supported President Donald Trump‘s 2017 executive order temporarily banning on citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. He stated, “It’s very prudent to say, ‘Let’s be careful about who comes into our country to make sure that they’re not terrorists.’”[64]

Cannabis

Scalise opposes the legalization of marijuana, which he deems a gateway drug for other drugs. He has a “D” rating from National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws for his voting history regarding cannabis-related causes.[65]

LGBT issues

According to the Washington Blade, Scalise has one of “the most anti-LGBT reputations of any lawmaker”. He opposed the repeal of the US military’s Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy and including sexuality under hate crime legislation.[clarification needed] He also opposes same-sex marriage, having praised the 2014 Robicheaux v. Caldwell ruling. Scalise condemned the Supreme Court’s ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges, which held that same-sex marriage bans violated the constitution.[66] Scalise’s voting record has a zero rating from the LGBT advocacy group Human Rights Campaign.[67]

2020 presidential election and aftermath

On January 6, 2021, Scalise voted to de-certify Biden’s victories in Arizona and Pennsylvania.[50][51]

Scalise condemned the Capitol attack as terrorism and compared it to the Congressional baseball shooting. “It would … be naive to think the [2017] shooter arrived at his decision in a vacuum”, Scalise said, adding, “It would be equally naive to think that the Capitol rioters arrived at their decisions in a void. Violent rhetoric helps radicalize people. Republicans and Democrats alike must have the moral clarity to call this language out whenever it is spoken, not only when it comes from the other side of the political aisle.”[68]

In February 2021, more than a month after Joe Biden’s inauguration, Scalise refused to acknowledge that the election was not stolen or fraudulent.[69] In May 2021, he called for the ouster of Liz Cheney as House Republican Conference Chair due to her vote to impeach Trump for inciting a mob to attack the U.S. Capitol.[70] On May 19, 2021, Scalise and the seven other House Republican leaders voted against establishing a national commission to investigate the January 6, 2021, attack on the United States Capitol Complex. Thirty-five House Republicans and all 217 Democrats present voted to establish such a commission.[71][72]

In October 2021, Fox News anchor Chris Wallace interviewed Scalise. Despite lack of evidence of any fraud and overwhelming evidence that the 2020 election was conducted fairly and accurately, Scalise refused to acknowledge that Trump lost the 2020 presidential election. His refusal to admit Trump’s loss was viewed as fear of Trump’s vindictiveness and willingness to kowtow to Trump in order to avoid being targeted by Trump.[73]

Other events

Speech at white nationalist convention

In 2002, Scalise was a speaker at a convention for the European-American Unity and Rights Organization (EURO), a group which was founded by David Duke. This became known in 2014 after political blogger[74][75] Lamar White, Jr. uncovered anonymous comments from 2002 on Stormfront, a white supremacist website, which made reference to Scalise as a 2002 speaker at the convention.[74][76][77][78][79][80] Scalise confirmed that he had spoken at the EURO conference in 2002 and stated at the time he did not know of the “racist nature of the group”. Scalise said he spoke about state tax legislation and that EURO was “one of the many groups that I spoke to regarding this critical legislation,” further stating that this is a group “whose views I wholeheartedly condemn.” Scalise apologized for speaking to the group, saying, “It was a mistake I regret, and I emphatically oppose the divisive racial and religious views groups like these hold.”[75]

Various Louisiana politicians, including Republican Governor Bobby Jindal and Democratic Congressman Cedric Richmond, defended Scalise’s character.[81] Speaker of the House John Boehner voiced his continued confidence in Scalise as Majority Whip.[76][82] Several Democratic members of Congress, as well as Mo Elleithee, a spokesperson for the Democratic National Committee (DNC), criticized Scalise and challenged his statement that he was not aware of the group’s affiliation with racism and anti-Semitism.[83] Mark Potok of the Southern Poverty Law Center called upon Scalise to step down from his leadership position as Majority Whip.[84][85][86]

Congressional baseball shooting

On June 14, 2017, at 7:09 am EDT, Scalise and three other people were shot and wounded by James Hodgkinson, a left-wing extremist with a record of domestic violence,[7][87] who opened fire with a rifle during a baseball practice of the Republican team for the annual Congressional Baseball Game. The practice was taking place at the Eugene Simpson Baseball Fields in the Del Ray neighborhood of Alexandria, Virginia. Scalise, the only member of Congress to be hit, was shot in the hip. Representative Mo Brooks, who was also at the practice, witnessed the attack and said he saw someone with a rifle behind the third base dugout. Brooks then heard Scalise scream from second base. Scalise crawled into right field, bleeding. Senator Jeff Flake and Representative Brad Wenstrup, a former podiatrist, ran to assist Scalise after Hodgkinson was shot.[88][89] Senator Rand Paul, also a witness, said he heard “as many as 50 shots”.[90]

Initially conscious, Scalise went into shock while being taken to MedStar Washington Hospital Center[91][92] in critical condition, where he underwent immediate surgery. He was hit by a single rifle bullet that “travelled across his pelvis, fracturing bones, injuring internal organs, and causing severe bleeding”.[91] Dr. Jack Sava at the MedStar Washington Hospital Center said that “when he arrived, he was in critical condition with an imminent risk of death”. By June 16, although still in critical condition, Sava said, “We have controlled internal bleeding and his vital signs have stabilized.” On June 17, it was announced that his condition had improved to “serious” and he was responsive enough to talk with his family.[93] On June 21, the hospital issued a press release stating: “Congressman Steve Scalise continues to make good progress. He is now listed in fair condition and is beginning an extended period of healing and rehabilitation.”[94][95]

On July 5, 2017, Scalise returned to the intensive care unit after becoming ill with an infection related to the shooting.[96]

On July 13, 2017, it was reported that Scalise had undergone additional surgery and that his condition had been upgraded to fair.[97] He was discharged from the hospital on July 26 and went through a period of inpatient rehabilitation.[98] On September 28, to applause and cheers, he returned to the House of Representatives, where he gave a speech about his experience related to the traumatic events.[99]

Hodgkinson, 66, was killed by police at the scene. He was married and lived in Belleville, Illinois, where he owned a small business doing home inspections, mold testing, and air-quality testing. He had encounters with police involving violence or firearms in 2006 and 2017; he was registered as a firearms owner in Illinois. In January 2017 he closed down his business. In the months before the shooting he was living in a car near the Alexandria baseball field and regularly visited a nearby YMCA.[100] He was a Bernie Sanders supporter and volunteer, and a fierce critic of Trump and the Republican Party on social media, in letters to the editor, and in phone calls to his representative.[7][87] Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring concluded Hodgkinson was “fueled by rage against Republican legislators” and the shooting was “an act of terrorism.”[101]

Ady Barkan video

In 2020, Scalise spread a video that was doctored to depict the political activist Ady Barkan, who is disabled and uses a speech-generating device, asking 2020 presidential candidate Joe Biden whether he supported defunding police, to which Biden appeared to reply in the affirmative. Barkan asked Scalise to delete the video, which was flagged by Twitter as manipulated media, and apologize. Scalise deleted the video; his spokesperson said that editing the video in this manner was “common practice.”[102][103]

Personal life

Scalise married Jennifer Ann Letulle on April 9, 2005.[104] They have two children.[105]

On June 30, 2018, a man left death threats against Scalise and his family.[106] The suspect, Carlos Bayon, was later convicted, and sentenced to five years in prison. He is appealing his conviction.[107]

See also

References

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  52. ^ Joachim, David S., “Louisianan Seeks to Extend Rapid Rise in House G.O.P.” Archived November 9, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, New York Times, June 19, 2014. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  53. ^ Parker, Ashley, and Jeremy W. Peters, “House Republicans Name McCarthy as Cantor’s Replacement” Archived October 1, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, New York Times, June 19, 2014. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  54. ^ Sherman, Jake; Bresnahan, John; Palmer, Anna (June 19, 2014). “Inside the House GOP leadership shake-up”. Politico. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
  55. ^ Palmer, Anna; Sherman, Jake. “To pick staff, Scalise turns to lobbyist”. Politico. Archived from the original on August 11, 2014. Retrieved August 6, 2014.
  56. ^ a b “Scalise sidesteps climate change debate: Earth’s temperature “goes up and down”. www.cbsnews.com. Retrieved 2021-11-04.
  57. ^ “Republicans’ Cop26 hopes undermined by colleagues’ climate disdain”. the Guardian. 2021-11-08. Retrieved 2021-11-08.
  58. ^ “Republicans slam Biden’s methane ‘overregulation’. E&E News. 3 November 2021. Retrieved 2021-11-04.
  59. ^ Demko, Paul; Cancryn, Adam. “GOP feels heat in wake of Obamacare ruling: ‘It’s all the downsides’. POLITICO. Retrieved 2018-12-16.
  60. ^ Beckett, Lois (June 14, 2017). “Steve Scalise: Republican wounded in baseball shooting is key figure in House”. The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on July 7, 2017. Retrieved July 8, 2017.
  61. ^ “Th irony of Scalise and Gun Control”. Daily Kos. Archived from the original on June 17, 2017. Retrieved July 8, 2017.
  62. ^ Ruiz, Michelle (October 9, 2017). “Gunned Down at Baseball Practice and Saved by a Lesbian Cop, Rep. Steve Scalise Remains Pro-Gun and Anti-LGBTQ”. Vogue. Archived from the original on December 31, 2017. Retrieved December 31, 2017.
  63. ^ Zanona, Melanie (14 March 2018). “House passes school safety bill amid gun protests”. The Hill. Retrieved March 16, 2018.
  64. ^ Blake, Aaron (January 29, 2017). “Coffman, Gardner join Republicans against President Trump’s travel ban; here’s where the rest stand”. Denver Post. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 30, 2017.
  65. ^ “Louisiana Scorecard”. NORML. Archived from the original on July 12, 2017. Retrieved December 31, 2017.
  66. ^ “The Voter’s Self Defense System”. Vote Smart. Retrieved 2022-04-12.
  67. ^ Johnson, Chris (June 14, 2017). “Rep. Scalise among victims in Va. shooting”. Washington Blade: Gay News, Politics, LGBT Rights. Archived from the original on October 21, 2017. Retrieved December 31, 2017.
  68. ^ Axelrod, Tal (13 January 2021). “Scalise labels Capitol rioting ‘domestic terrorism’. TheHill. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  69. ^ “PolitiFact – Steve Scalise won’t say election was not stolen. Who else won’t?”. PolitiFact. 24 February 2021. Retrieved 2021-03-22.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  70. ^ Holzberg, Melissa. “Steve Scalise Supports Replacing Cheney With Stefanik”. Forbes. Retrieved 2021-05-05.
  71. ^ Roll Call 154 Bill Number: H. R. 3233 117th Congress, 1st Session, United States House of Representatives, May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  72. ^ How Republicans voted on a commission to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, Washington Post, May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  73. ^ Baragona, Justin (10 October 2021). “Wallace Grills Scalise for Still Refusing to Say Trump Lost 2020”. The Daily Beast.
  74. ^ a b Costa, Robert. “House Majority Whip Scalise confirms he spoke to white nationalists in 2002”. Washington Post. Archived from the original on December 29, 2014. Retrieved December 29, 2014.
  75. ^ a b Martin, Jonathan & Calmes, Jackie (December 31, 2014). “Republicans Try to Fix Damage Scalise’s 2002 Speech Could Do in 2016”. New York Times. Archived from the original on December 31, 2014. Retrieved December 31, 2014.
  76. ^ a b Jaffe, Alexandra & Walsh, Deirdra (December 31, 2014). “GOP leadership stands by Scalise after white supremacist speech”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 30, 2014. Retrieved December 31, 2014.
  77. ^ Sarlin, Benjy (December 29, 2014). “GOP leader Steve Scalise may have addressed supremacist conference”. MSNBC. Archived from the original on December 30, 2014. Retrieved December 29, 2014.
  78. ^ Reilly, Mollie & Grim, Ryan (December 29, 2014). “House Majority Whip Steve Scalise Spoke At White Supremacist Conference In 2002”. The Huffington Post. Archived from the original on December 29, 2014. Retrieved December 29, 2014.
  79. ^ “House Majority Whip Steve Scalise Was Reportedly an Honored Guest at 2002 International White Supremacist Convention”. December 28, 2014. Archived from the original on December 29, 2014. Retrieved December 29, 2014.
  80. ^ Calderone, Michael (December 30, 2014). “How Louisiana Blogger Lamar White, Jr. Landed The Steve Scalise White Supremacist Scoop”. Huffington Post. Archived from the original on December 31, 2014. Retrieved December 31, 2014.
  81. ^ O’Donoghue, Julia (December 29, 2014). “Steve Scalise attended white nationalist event, but says he wasn’t aware of group’s views”. The Times-Picayune. Archived from the original on December 30, 2014. Retrieved December 29, 2014.
  82. ^ Bendery, Jennifer (December 30, 2014). “John Boehner Backs Steve Scalise Amid Controversy Over White Supremacist Meeting”. Huffington Post. Archived from the original on December 31, 2014. Retrieved December 31, 2014.
  83. ^ Sarlin, Benjy (March 19, 2015). “Steve Scalise: Speaking at supremacist event ‘a mistake I regret’. MSNBC. Archived from the original on December 31, 2014.
  84. ^ Berman, Mark (December 30, 2014). “SPLC calls for congressman who spoke to white supremacist group to step down from leadership”. Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 1, 2015. Retrieved December 31, 2014.
  85. ^ Scileifstein, Mark (December 30, 2014). “Steve Scalise denials not believable and he should resign as whip, civil rights group says”. The Times-Picayune. Archived from the original on March 11, 2017. Retrieved June 15, 2017.
  86. ^ Sullivan, Peter (December 20, 2014). “Civil rights group: Scalise must go”. The HIll. Archived from the original on June 18, 2017. Retrieved June 15, 2017.
  87. ^ a b Pearce, Matt; Tanfani, Joseph (14 June 2017). “Virginia gunman hated Republicans, and ‘was always in his own little world’. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2018-06-07.
  88. ^ “Scalise critical, shooter ID’d as James Hodgkinson”. Fox News. June 14, 2017. Archived from the original on June 15, 2017. Retrieved June 15, 2017.
  89. ^ Karl de Vries and Eugene Scott. “Rep. Scalise shot in Virginia”. CNN. Archived from the original on June 14, 2017. Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  90. ^ “Republican Steve Scalise Shot at Alexandria Baseball Practice”. Newsweek. June 14, 2017.
  91. ^ a b Choi, David (June 16, 2017). “Scalise doctor: He came in with an ‘imminent risk of death,’ recovery now a good possibility”. Business Insider. Archived from the original on January 18, 2018. Retrieved June 17, 2017.
  92. ^ “Steve Scalise facing more surgeries, hospital update says”. NOLA.com. Archived from the original on June 15, 2017. Retrieved June 15, 2017.
  93. ^ “Scalise Shooting: GOP congressman upgraded from ‘critical’ to ‘serious’ condition”. Fox News. June 17, 2017. Archived from the original on June 18, 2017. Retrieved June 17, 2017.
  94. ^ “Condition Update: Rep. Steve Scalise”. MedStar Washington Hospital Center. June 21, 2017. Archived from the original on July 13, 2017. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  95. ^ Howard, Jacqueline (June 21, 2017). “Rep. Steve Scalise is now in ‘fair’ condition after shooting”. CNN. Archived from the original on July 14, 2017. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  96. ^ Choi, David (July 6, 2017). “Rep. Steve Scalise re-admitted to intensive care unit”. Fox News. Archived from the original on July 6, 2017. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  97. ^ “Rep. Steve Scalise has new operation after shooting, condition fair”. NBC News. Archived from the original on July 15, 2017. Retrieved July 15, 2017.
  98. ^ “Scalise discharged from hospital”. CNN. Archived from the original on July 26, 2017. Retrieved July 26, 2017.
  99. ^ “Steve Scalise returns to Capitol”. CBS. Archived from the original on October 9, 2017.
  100. ^ Pagliery, Jose (June 15, 2017). “Suspect in congressional shooting was Bernie Sanders supporter, strongly anti-Trump”. CNN. Retrieved 13 September 2020.
  101. ^ https://www.alexandriava.gov/uploadedFiles/commattorney/info/17-001%20-%20Simpson%20Field%20Shooting%20-%20FINAL%2010.06.17.pdf[dead link]
  102. ^ McCarthy, Tom (August 31, 2020). “Activist Ady Barkan tells top Republican to apologise over doctored video”. The Guardian. Retrieved August 31, 2020.
  103. ^ O’Sullivan, Donie; Mucha, Sarah; Clary, Greg (August 31, 2020). “Twitter labels Scalise tweet of Biden interview about police funding ‘manipulated media’ before he took it down”. CNN. Retrieved August 31, 2020.
  104. ^ “Marriage Annacouments”. Times Picayune. 2006. Archived from the original on December 31, 2014. Retrieved December 31, 2014.
  105. ^ Alpert, Bruce, “You can call him ‘Mr. Majority Whip’ – Rep. Steve Scalise wins House leadership race”,
    Times-Picayune, June 19, 2014. “… [W]ife, Jennifer, and children Madison and Harrison”; caption. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  106. ^ DeBonis, Mike (August 2, 2018). “N.Y. man charged with threatening top House GOP leaders over Trump immigration policy”. The Washington Post. Retrieved August 3, 2018. Hey listen, this message is for you and the people that sent you there,” Bayon allegedly said in the message to Scalise. “You are taking ours, we are taking yours. Anytime, anywhere. We know where they are. We are not going to feed them sandwiches; we are going to feed them lead. Make no mistake you will pay. Ojo por ojo, diente por diente. [“An eye for an eye; a tooth for a tooth.”] That is our law and we are the majority. Have a good day.
  107. ^ “The Latest: Atty: Man says messages weren’t meant as threats”. ABC News. Retrieved 2021-05-22.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Louisiana’s 1st congressional district

2008–present
Incumbent
Preceded by

House Majority Whip
2014–2019
Succeeded by

Preceded by

House Minority Whip
2019–present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by

Chair of the Republican Study Committee
2013–2014
Succeeded by

U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
105th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

  • Committee on Energy and Commerce
    • Subcommittee on Communications and Technology
    • Subcommittee on Energy and Power
    • Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations
  • Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis (Ranking Member)

Legislation

Learn more about legislation sponsored and co-sponsored by Congressman Scalise.

Issues

2nd Amendment

A strong supporter of the Second Amendment, Congressman Scalise has sponsored and cosponsored legislation protecting citizens’ right to keep and bear arms. The ability of law abiding citizens to bear arms and the right to self-defense is a fundamental constitutional right of every law-abiding American.

Agriculture

Agriculture was a critical building block in America’s foundation and has played a crucial role in the culture and economy of Louisiana and the First Congressional District. The First District is blessed with an abundance of agriculture resources, and Congressman Scalise understands the importance of protecting these invaluable resources.

Communication and Technology

Broadband internet and mobile communications networks have spurred innovative services and devices that have transformed nearly every aspect of our daily lives.

Education

Congressman Scalise is committed to ensuring that students in Louisiana and around the country receive the highest quality education. As a state legislator and Member of Congress, he has continuously supported excellence in education at the primary, secondary, and post-secondary levels.

Energy

Congressman Scalise strongly believes in and fights for an ‘America first’ energy strategy that will put our country on the path to energy dominance.

Family Values

Congressman Scalise is a proven leader when it comes to protecting Louisiana’s family values. Congressman Scalise has fought to promote traditional marriage and the right to life and continues to fight against attempts to weaken these values.

Health Care

Access to affordable health care is out of reach for too many people. Congressman Scalise believes that Obamacare has failed the American people and our economy. He is working with his colleagues in Congress to enact meaningful legislation that will provide patients’ rights to choose the coverage that best suits their needs.

Hurricane Recovery and Coastal Restoration

Hurricane Katrina and the numerous natural disasters that have caused destruction to our state since have reminded us how important levee protection is to our area and underscored the critical role of our coastal wetlands.

Immigration

The United States was founded on immigration and it was also founded on the rule of law. Congressman Scalise wants to secure the United States’ borders with stronger security, including a border wall, and supports the Administration’s purposeful enforcement of existing laws.

Maritime

Inland waterways and harbors are important components of the nation’s transportation system. Like highways and runways, our nation’s 12,000-mile Mississippi inland waterway system, which funnels into the Gulf of Mexico at the mouth in Louisiana, is an important transport resource.

National Security

Congress must protect the security of the United States, both at home and abroad. America faces a diverse range of threats, from radical Islamic terrorists determined to destroy our way of life, to emboldened rogue regimes such as North Korea who seek to threaten the U.S. and our allies with the development of nuclear ballistic missiles.

Social Security

Congress has a duty to preserve the Social Security program for workers and retirees who have played by the rules and paid into Social Security throughout their careers. Congress must also work to make the program sustainable for future generations.

Taxes and Economy

For decades, Washington’s spending problem led to a tax code that hurt American families, small businesses, and our nation’s economy. In 2017, Congress passed and the president signed into law the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This bill creates a simpler and fairer code for all Americans.

Veterans Affairs

Congressman Scalise believes we owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to our nation’s veterans. Throughout American history, the men and women of the armed forces have answered their nation’s call to battle. These men and women have bravely sacrificed for their country and defended its freedom while risking their lives and livelihoods.

X
Clay HigginsClay Higgins – LA3

Current Position: US Representative for LA District 3 since 2017
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): US Army from 1979 – 1985

Other Positions:  
Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Border Security

Featured Quote: 
I support individual freedoms, and I certainly stand against oppression. Neither government nor private employers have the right to mandate medical procedures. We’re drawing the line here.

Featured Video: 
WAR ON COPS: Congressman Clay Higgins Speaks Out.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Congressman Clay Higgins (R-LA) voted against H.R. 3755, Democrats’ bill to legalize on-demand abortions until birth and override state and federal laws protecting the unborn.

Congressman Higgins issued the following statement:

“Democrats want the ability to murder an unborn child at any time for any reason up until the moment of birth. It is pure evil. Some of us are fighting back against this madness and working to defeat this abomination of a bill. Our fight to protect the unborn and the right to life shall continue. We will not stop.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for LA District 3 since 2017
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): US Army from 1979 – 1985

Other Positions:  
Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Border Security

Featured Quote: 
I support individual freedoms, and I certainly stand against oppression. Neither government nor private employers have the right to mandate medical procedures. We’re drawing the line here.

Featured Video: 
WAR ON COPS: Congressman Clay Higgins Speaks Out.

News

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Congressman Clay Higgins (R-LA) voted against H.R. 3755, Democrats’ bill to legalize on-demand abortions until birth and override state and federal laws protecting the unborn.

Congressman Higgins issued the following statement:

“Democrats want the ability to murder an unborn child at any time for any reason up until the moment of birth. It is pure evil. Some of us are fighting back against this madness and working to defeat this abomination of a bill. Our fight to protect the unborn and the right to life shall continue. We will not stop.”

Twitter

About

Clay Higgins 1

Source: Government page

Captain Clay Higgins is a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives representing South Louisiana.

Raised on a horse ranch, Clay Higgins’ South Louisiana roots run deep. After graduating from high school, he attended LSU and then went on to serve in the United States Army/Louisiana National Guard as a Military Police Officer, and he attained the rank of E-6, Staff Sergeant.

Higgins had many successful years in business but returned to uniform service as a street cop in 2004. He worked patrol, primarily night shift, and he was a well-known SWAT operator. Prior to joining Congress in 2017, Higgins is best known for his Crimestopper videos for the St. Landry Parish Sheriff’s Office. The program was one of the most successful in the history of law enforcement. Most of the featured crimes were solved and what was most significant was that many of the suspects responded to “Uncle Clay’s” message of redemption and turned themselves in. Captain Higgins continues to actively serve the Thin Blue Line retaining a valid Law Enforcement commission and his Louisiana State POST Certification.

As a veteran and highly decorated law enforcement officer, Congressman Higgins continues to protect and serve in the nation’s capital. He is a member of the House Homeland Security Committee and the House Oversight & Reform Committee.

A committed Constitutionalist, Congressman Higgins believes in restoring the federal government envisioned by our Founding Fathers. Higgins believes in smaller government, less bureaucracy, free markets, a strong national defense and securing America’s sovereign borders. From Morgan City to the Texas line, Higgins has sworn a sacred oath to protect and serve the people of South Louisiana.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses

House Freedom Caucus

The House Freedom Caucus gives a voice to countless Americans who feel that Washington does not represent them. We support open, accountable, and limited government, the Constitution and the rule of law, and policies that promote the liberty, safety, and prosperity of all Americans.

Republican Study Committee

The Republican Study Committee (RSC) has served as the conservative caucus of House Republicans and a leading influencer on the Right since its original founding in 1973. It exists to bring like-minded House members together to promote a strong, principled legislative agenda that will limit government, strengthen our national defense, boost America’s economy, preserve traditional values and balance our budget.

House Energy Action Team (HEAT)

The purpose of the House Energy Action Team is to supplement ongoing leadership, committee, and conference efforts by providing a committed, talented and well-organized group of House members to serve as messengers of House GOP energy policy.

Offices

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Glen Clay Higgins (born August 24, 1961) is an American politician and reserve law enforcement officer from the state of Louisiana. A Republican, he is the U.S. representative for Louisiana’s 3rd congressional district. The district, which contains much of the territory once represented by former Governor Edwin Edwards and former Senator John Breaux, is in the southwestern corner of the state and includes Lafayette, Lake Charles, New Iberia and Opelousas. He won the runoff election on December 10, 2016, defeating fellow Republican Scott Angelle.

Although an elected official, Higgins continues to hold a law enforcement commission as a reserve officer with the Louisiana Attorney General’s office.[1]

Early life and education

Clay Higgins is the seventh of eight children. He was born in New Orleans, and his family moved to Covington, Louisiana, when he was six years old. The family raised and trained horses.[2] After graduation from Covington High School, Higgins attended Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.[3]

Career

At age 18, Higgins enlisted in the Military Police Corps of the Louisiana National Guard, serving for six years (1979–85) and reaching the rank of staff sergeant.[3][4][5]

He worked for several years as a manager of car dealerships.[2]

Local law enforcement

In 2004 Higgins became a patrol officer for the Opelousas City Police Department. By 2007, Opelousas Police Department Chief Perry Gallow was prepared to take major disciplinary action against Higgins. In a letter to the City Council, he wrote, “Clay Higgins used unnecessary force on a subject during the execution of a warrant and later gave false statements during an internal investigation. Although he later recanted his story and admitted to striking a suspect in handcuffs and later releasing him”.[6] Higgins resigned before disciplinary action could be imposed. In September 2016 during his Congressional campaign, Higgins claimed to have resigned for other reasons. Gallow, by then retired, disputed Higgins’s claim at that time.[6]

Higgins next worked for the Port Barre Police Department through 2010. In 2011, he joined the St. Landry Parish Sheriff’s Office. After the office’s public information officer was reassigned in October 2014, Higgins was appointed to the role and promoted to captain.[2][7] As public information officer, Higgins made videos for the parish Crime Stoppers program. He first used standard scripts, but began to improvise in his own style, appealing to suspects to surrender and sometimes threatening them by name.[8] His videos went viral, and in 2015 he was described by national media as the “Cajun John Wayne” for his intimidating persona.[4] Sheriff Bobby Guidroz urged restraint, advising Higgins to refrain from personal comments about suspects and to keep a professional tone in his videos.[9]

Higgins also made a video for the state police, with a script that prompted protests from suspects’ families and the ACLU. He resigned from the St. Landry Parish Sheriff’s Office in February 2016.[10][11] Guidroz had warned him against using disrespectful and demeaning language about suspects, ordering him to “Tone down his unprofessional comments on our weekly Crime Stoppers messages”.[12] He issued a statement saying that Higgins’ comments underlined “a growing undertone of insubordination and lack of discipline on Higgins’ part”.[13] Guidroz said that Higgins had gone against department policy by misusing his badge and uniform for personal profit and gain, citing Higgins’s wearing a uniform in an ad for a security firm. He also reprimanded Higgins for using his badge and uniform on his personal website to support sales of T-shirts and shot glasses for his Limited Liability Corporation (LLC). Higgins also used the department’s physical address in registering his LLC with the state; both actions were against department policy.[9]

Salon reported that during this period, Higgins “negotiated paid speaking appearances with other police departments. In one email, Higgins discussed his request for a speaker’s fee that included shopping money for his wife and part of the fuel for his friend’s private plane.”[14] He asked for cash payments. Higgins also conducted his private business via email on “his government email account during work hours without the permission or knowledge of his supervisors. Higgins also appears to have attempted to conceal his earnings from the IRS in order to avoid wage garnishment for unpaid taxes. Whether those actions constitute tax fraud is unclear.”[14]

Shortly after resigning from St. Landry Parish, in March 2016 Higgins was accepted and sworn in as a Reserve Deputy Marshal in the city of Lafayette, Louisiana.[15] Reserve forces in city and Parish Sheriff’s offices in Louisiana receive regular training and are commissioned as law enforcement officers. They are part-time and made up of persons from many walks of life.[16]

In 2019, Higgins retired his commission as a Reserve Deputy Marshal. He maintains an active law enforcement commission as a reserve officer with the Louisiana Attorney General’s office.[1]

Honors

Higgins was awarded the title of Kentucky Colonel in March 2016 by Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin.[17]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2016

After Higgins’s resignation from the St. Landry Sheriff’s Office, Chris Comeaux, a Republican campaign staffer, recruited him to run for office.[8] In May 2016, Higgins declared his candidacy in the 2016 election in the 3rd district.[18][19] He crossed district lines to run for this seat, as his home in Port Barre is in the neighboring 5th district. Members of the House are not constitutionally required to live in the district they represent.[3] A Super PAC headed by U.S. Senator David Vitter‘s former chief of staff supported Higgins’s candidacy.[18]

Higgins finished second in the nonpartisan blanket primary held on November 8, behind Republican Scott Angelle, in which nearly 68% of the parish voted.[18][20] He faced Angelle in a runoff election on December 10 and won with 56.1% of the vote; turnout had declined to about 28% of voters.[18]

2018

Higgins was challenged by Democrats Rob Anderson, Mildred “Mimi” Methvin, Larry Rader, and Verone Thomas, Libertarian Aaron Andrus, and Republican Josh Guillory.[21] President Trump endorsed Higgins.[22] He defeated all six challengers in the jungle primary, winning reelection without a runoff.[23]

In response to protests in response to the police shooting death of Trayford Pellerin, Higgins made a post on Facebook stating he would “drop 10 of you where you stand.”[24]

Tenure

Higgins was sworn into the House of Representatives on January 3, 2017.[25]

He has said that he sleeps on an air mattress on the floor of his Capitol Hill office.[26][27] He works out and showers in the House gymnasium in the early morning.

Higgins voted with other Republicans in favor of the American Health Care Act of 2017, which would have repealed and replaced major portions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.[28]

In December 2017, Higgins voted with other Republicans in favor of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.[29][30] He touted the Act’s benefits, but the Congressional Budget Office projected that GDP growth would decline to 2.4% in 2019 as business investment and government purchases slowed.[31]

Committee assignments

[32]

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Abortion

Higgins is anti-abortion and has compared women choosing to terminate their pregnancy to the Holocaust.[35]

Guns

Higgins supports gun rights and opposes the regulation of firearms. In 2017, he said, “The modern hysteria over guns is another example of our weakened society. Guns weren’t really regulated at all prior to the ’60s in America. Throughout our history, prior to just 50 years ago, a child could purchase a gun from any seller, if Daddy sent him with the money.”[35]

In 2018, Higgins commented on his Facebook page about a New York Times op-ed by retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens that called for the repeal of the Second Amendment.[36] Higgins said, “Judge John Paul Stevens, Your Honor, whatever… put together any badass socialists you can muster. As their attorney, make sure they have their affairs in order. Molon Labe.”[37]

Higgins opposes the carrying of weapons at demonstrations. In 2020 he posted on Facebook that he would “drop 10 of you where you stand”, referring to potential armed demonstrators.[24] This inspired the Not Fucking Around Coalition to have an armed demonstration which Higgins, who was called out, was absent from.

Immigration

In July 2018, House Democrats called for a floor vote on abolishing U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). House Republicans refused and called for the House to vote on a resolution by Higgins and Kevin McCarthy to support ICE.[38]

LGBT rights

Higgins opposes same-sex marriage. He says he believes that states should have the right to ban same-sex marriage, contrary to the Supreme Court’s ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges.[35]

National security

Higgins supported Trump’s 2017 executive order to temporarily curtail travel from certain countries, saying, “The president’s executive order for a short-term restriction on visa entries from seven countries that are known to foster terrorists, combined with a systematic review of our immigration and vetting procedure, is reasonable.”[39]

Higgins has promoted himself and spoken at rallies by anti-government militia groups. When informed that a Black militia group protesting police brutality might show up at a protest, however, he suggested on Facebook in September 2020 that he would shoot them (“drop any 10 of you where you stand”). He included a picture of Black militia members at a protest. Facebook removed the post per its policy to remove content that “incites or facilitates serious violence”.[40]

Texas v. Pennsylvania

In December 2020, Higgins was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden defeated incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.

COVID-19

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Higgins was an outspoken skeptic, and asserted that the Chinese Communist Party had created the disease as biological warfare.[41]

In May 2020 CNN interview, Higgins described face masks as a “bacteria trap” and said they did not help to slow the spread of COVID-19, noting that he did not believe they were effective as smells are able to pass through them.[42]

In May 2021, Higgins wrote on Facebook, “I do not support mandatory vaccines, mask mandates or any form of required vaccine passport.”[41]

In July 2021, Higgins introduced a bill that would make it illegal for employers to mandate vaccination for their employees.[43] In the same month, Higgins confirmed that his wife Becca and he had both contracted COVID-19 in January 2020, and that they had since contracted it a second time, along with their son.[43] He has not publicly confirmed his vaccination status.[41]

Social media controversies

In early July 2017, Higgins posted a five-minute video on YouTube from Auschwitz concentration camp, including a section from within one of the gas chambers. He said, “This is why homeland security must be squared away, why our military must be invincible”.[44] This video was widely condemned as inappropriate, including by the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum, whose spokesman wrote in a Twitter post that “the building should not be used as a stage”.[45][46] Higgins later removed the video and issued an apology.[47][44]

Several of Higgins’s Facebook posts have been removed for contravening the company’s policy against inciting violence. On September 1, 2020, Higgins posted a photograph of protesters at a Black Lives Matter protest in Louisiana, suggesting that armed demonstrators should be met with force to “eliminate the threat”.[48] After Facebook deleted the post, Higgins wrote: “America is being manipulated into a new era of government control. Your liberty is threatened from within. […] Welcome to the front lines, Ladies and Gentlemen. I suggest you get your mind right. I’ll advise when it’s time gear up, mount up, and roll out.” This post was deleted for contravening the same policy.[48]

Personal life

Higgins has been married four times. Higgins married Eloisa Rovati. They had a daughter together, who died a few months after she was born. Higgins and Rovati divorced. She later died in an automobile crash.[4] Higgins then married Rosemary “Stormy” Rothkamm-Hambrice. He adopted her child from a previous marriage, and they had two more children together.[49] They divorced in 1999.[3][50][51] Higgins’s third wife was Kara Seymour. They also divorced, and Higgins lives in Port Barre, Louisiana, with his fourth wife, Becca.[3]

Rothkamm-Hambrice, then living in Mississippi, filed suit against him the day after the 2016 election for unpaid child support of more than $140,000, including interest on overdue payments.[50][52] Higgins said that he sought reduced payments in 2005 after changing careers to law enforcement, but the issue was never settled. The Daily Advertiser reported: “Calls about the case made by this newspaper in September, first to the Texas Attorney General’s Office, then to Louisiana courts, brought similar responses from both places: Clay Higgins was not in trouble with the courts in either state over the child support payments.”[49]

In July 2021, Higgins said he had been infected with COVID-19 for the second time, after an infection in January 2020.[53][43]

In August 2021, Higgins challenged a critic from Alaska to a physical fight in a ring, saying that he would be in Alaska in 2022; the challenge was accepted.[54]

References

  1. ^ a b Turk, Leslie (May 24, 2019). “Shaq, Clay Higgins among nearly 50 Lafayette reserve deputies decommissioned by city marshal”. The Advocate. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c Cook, Lanie Lee (May 13, 2015). “St. Landry deputy finds new meaning, viral fame in his role of no-nonsense sheriff’s spokesman”. The Advocate. Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Georges Media. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d e Stickney, Ken (September 16, 2016). “Higgins: God led him to challenge Angelle”. Jackson Sun. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  4. ^ a b c Holley, Peter (May 6, 2015). “Meet the ‘Cajun John Wayne,’ the deputy whose meme-worthy videos terrify criminals”. The Washington Post. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  5. ^ “Clay Higgins”, House of Representatives
  6. ^ a b “Clay Higgins resigned from OPD in 2007 on cusp of major disciplinary measures”. The Independent. September 29, 2016. Retrieved July 5, 2017.
  7. ^ “Meet the man hailed as the “John Wayne” of Cajun country”. CBS News. New York City: CBS Broadcasting. September 3, 2015. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  8. ^ a b Stickney, Ken (December 16, 2016). “Higgins carves unlikely path to Capitol”. The Daily Advertiser. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  9. ^ a b “UPDATE: Sheriff issues expanded statement; Clay Higgins leaves the St. Landry Parish Sheriff’s Office”. KATC. February 29, 2016. Archived from the original on December 24, 2016. Retrieved December 12, 2016.
  10. ^ Dickerson, Seth (May 18, 2016). “Clay Higgins announces run for congress”. The Daily Advertiser. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  11. ^ Ng, Alfred (February 29, 2016). “La. officer quits because he can’t make ‘demeaning’ comments”. The New York Daily News. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  12. ^ “UPDATE: Sheriff issues expanded statement; Clay Higgins leaves the St. Landry Parish Sheriff’s Office”. Archived from the original on December 24, 2016. Retrieved December 12, 2016.
  13. ^ “Clay Higgins’ Departure from the St. Landry Parish Sheriff’s Department” (PDF). St. Landry Parish Sheriff’s Office.
  14. ^ a b Kopplin, Zack (October 2, 2016). “Uniform misconduct: Inside the rise and possible fall of “The Cajun John Wayne,” GOP congressional candidate Clay Higgins”. Salon.
  15. ^ Dickerson, Seth (March 17, 2016). “Higgins sworn in as reserve Lafayette deputy marshal”. The Daily Advertiser. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  16. ^ “Who We Are: Reserve Deputy Program”, East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office, 2011. Quote: “Our Reserve Deputies are part time, non-salaried, fully-commissioned law enforcement officers. Reserve Deputies have the same responsibilities, the same duties, and receive the same level of training and, most importantly, they have the same authority as their regularly employed counterparts. Opportunities exist within the Reserve organization for individuals to serve in all areas of law enforcement.”; accessed 30 April 2018
  17. ^ Reed, Chris (March 30, 2016). “Captain Clay Higgins Awarded Prestigious Title From Kentucky Governor”. HOT107.9 radio. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  18. ^ a b c d Ballard, Mark (December 10, 2016). “Clay Higgins – Cajun John Wayne – defeats Scott Angelle in 3rd District congressional race”. The Advocate. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  19. ^ “Clay Higgins announces run for Louisiana third congressional district seat”. KATC. May 18, 2016. Archived from the original on May 20, 2016. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  20. ^ Ballard, Mark (December 3, 2016). “3rd Congressional District race pitting Scott Angelle against Clay Higgins seen as tossup”. The Advocate. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  21. ^ “Candidate Inquiry”. July 20, 2018. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  22. ^ Hilburn, Greg (June 25, 2018). “Trump tweets: ‘We want Clay!’. The News Star. Retrieved July 7, 2018.
  23. ^ Stole, Bryn (July 20, 2018). “U.S. Rep. Clay Higgins avoids runoff, wins second term”. The Advocate. Retrieved November 6, 2018.
  24. ^ a b “Higgins facing criticism over social media post on rumors of armed militias in Lafayette”. KATC. September 2, 2020.
  25. ^ Barfield Berry, Deborah (January 4, 2017). “New Louisiana lawmakers sworn in”. The Daily Advertiser. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  26. ^ Stickney, Ken (August 2017). “Does Clay Higgins still sleep in his office?”. The Daily Advertiser. Lafayette, Louisiana: Gannett Company. Retrieved January 29, 2018.
  27. ^ Stickney, Ken (February 21, 2017). “Meet the Cajun congressman who sleeps on his office floor”. The Shreveport Times. Shreveport, Louisiana: Gannett Company. Retrieved February 25, 2017.
  28. ^ “Final Vote Results for Roll Call 256”.
  29. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (December 19, 2017). “How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill”. The New York Times. New York City. Retrieved December 31, 2017.
  30. ^ “GOP tax plan has Louisiana-specific benefits, senators say”. The Times-Picayune. New Orleans, Louisiana: Advance Publications. December 21, 2017. Retrieved December 31, 2017.
  31. ^ “An Update to the Economic Outlook: 2018 to 2028” (PDF). U.S. Congressional Budget Office.
  32. ^ “Committees and Caucuses”. Congressman Clay Higgins. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  33. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. December 6, 2017. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  34. ^ “Committees & Caucuses”. Congressman Clay Higgins. December 13, 2012. Retrieved April 25, 2021.
  35. ^ a b c Bess, Gabby (January 6, 2017). “An Incredibly Upsetting List of All the New Republican Congress Members”. Broadly. Brooklyn, New York: Vice Media LLC. Retrieved December 31, 2017.
  36. ^ Stevens, John Paul (March 27, 2018). “John Paul Stevens: Repeal the Second Amendment”. The New York Times. New York City. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 29, 2018.
  37. ^ “Captain Clay Higgins”. www.facebook.com. Retrieved March 29, 2018.
  38. ^ Wong, Scott; Brufke, Julie Grace (July 16, 2018). “House GOP reverses, cancels vote on Dem bill to abolish ICE”. The Hill. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  39. ^ Blake, Aaron (January 29, 2017). “Coffman, Gardner join Republicans against President Trump’s travel ban; here’s where the rest stand”. Denver Post. Denver, Colorado: Digital First Media. Retrieved January 30, 2017.
  40. ^ Hernandez, Salvador; Mimms, Sarah. “A Republican Member of Congress Threatened to Kill Armed Demonstrators In A Facebook Post”. Buzzfeed News. Retrieved August 2, 2020.
  41. ^ a b c Weisman, Jonathan (July 26, 2021). “Rep. Clay Higgins, a staunch opponent of mask mandates, announces he and his family have Covid-19”. The New York Times. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  42. ^ Umholtz, Katelyn (May 28, 2020). ‘Bacteria traps’ is how Louisiana Rep. Clay Higgins describes coronavirus face masks on CNN”. The Advocate. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  43. ^ a b c “Clay Higgins introduces bill aimed at making vaccine mandates by employers illegal”. The Advocate. July 30, 2021. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  44. ^ a b “Congressman apologies for video in gas chamber at Nazi concentration camp”. The Guardian. Associated Press. July 6, 2017. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  45. ^ “US congressman condemned for Auschwitz gas chamber video”. BBC. July 6, 2017. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  46. ^ “Auschwitz Memorial condemns congressman’s gas chamber video”. ABC News. July 5, 2017. Retrieved July 5, 2017.
  47. ^ Elliott, Debbie (July 5, 2017). “Congressman Retracts Auschwitz Video And Apologizes, After Criticism”. NPR. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  48. ^ a b Swanson, Ian (September 2, 2020). “Facebook removes GOP lawmaker’s post for inciting violence”. The Hill. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  49. ^ a b Stickney, Ken (November 16, 2016). “Will dusty child support case hobble Higgins?”. The Daily Advertiser. Retrieved March 17, 2018.
  50. ^ a b Stickney, Ken (November 16, 2016). “Will dusty child support case hobble Higgins?”. The Daily Advertiser. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  51. ^ Ballard, Mark (December 8, 2016). “In newly released tape recordings, Higgins says winning election will help him pay $100K-plus in child support”. The Advocate. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  52. ^ Ballard, Mark (November 11, 2016). “Clay Higgins, in runoff for 3rd District seat, faces child support lawsuit from former wife”. The Advocate. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  53. ^ Stelloh, Tim; Caldwell, Leigh Ann; Talbot, Haley (July 25, 2021). “GOP congressman says he has Covid-19 for second time”. Yahoo! News. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  54. ^ Fink, Jenni (August 20, 2021). “Clay Higgins tells man who called him “traitor” over 2020 election to “find ring” for fight”. Newsweek.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Louisiana’s 3rd congressional district

2017–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
262nd
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

  • Committee on Homeland Security
    • Subcommittee on Border Security (Ranking Member)
    • Subcommittee on Oversight
  • Committee on Oversight and Reform
    • Subcommittee on Environment

Legislation

Learn more about legislation sponsored and co-sponsored by Congressman Higgins.

Issues

X
Mike JohnsonMike Johnson – LA4

Current Position: US Representative for LA District 4 since 2017
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2015 – 2017

Featured Quote: 
Re-imposed mask mandates. Migrants flooding into the country assisted by the Administration. Spiking crime, economic stagnation, rising consumer prices. The Biden Administration is administering our country’s decline.

Featured Video: 
Border crisis an ‘unprecedented, unmitigated disaster’: Rep. Mike Johnson

Members of Louisiana’s congressional delegation are requesting President Biden and Congress provide additional assistance amid Hurricane Ida’s “catastrophic” impact on the state.

“Hurricane Ida moved slowly through Louisiana causing catastrophic wind damage and flooding in numerous parishes and leaving nearly 1,000,000 people statewide without electricity, which experts say it will take weeks to restore,” said the delegation on Thursday.

“At this time, many communities remain without access to drinking water, food, gasoline, and basic needs, while temperatures remain in excess of 100 degrees.”

The letter came from Republican Sens. John Kennedy and Bill Cassidy, along with multiple House members – and Reps. Clay Higgins, R, Steve Scalise, R, Mike Johnson, R, Garret Graves, R, Julia Letlow, R, and Troy Carter, D.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for LA District 4 since 2017
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2015 – 2017

Featured Quote: 
Re-imposed mask mandates. Migrants flooding into the country assisted by the Administration. Spiking crime, economic stagnation, rising consumer prices. The Biden Administration is administering our country’s decline.

Featured Video: 
Border crisis an ‘unprecedented, unmitigated disaster’: Rep. Mike Johnson

News

Members of Louisiana’s congressional delegation are requesting President Biden and Congress provide additional assistance amid Hurricane Ida’s “catastrophic” impact on the state.

“Hurricane Ida moved slowly through Louisiana causing catastrophic wind damage and flooding in numerous parishes and leaving nearly 1,000,000 people statewide without electricity, which experts say it will take weeks to restore,” said the delegation on Thursday.

“At this time, many communities remain without access to drinking water, food, gasoline, and basic needs, while temperatures remain in excess of 100 degrees.”

The letter came from Republican Sens. John Kennedy and Bill Cassidy, along with multiple House members – and Reps. Clay Higgins, R, Steve Scalise, R, Mike Johnson, R, Garret Graves, R, Julia Letlow, R, and Troy Carter, D.

About

Source: Government page

Congressman Mike Johnson is a Republican member of Congress proudly serving Louisiana’s Fourth District. He represents the nearly 760,000 residents of 15 parishes in the northwest and western regions of the state. Mike was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives on December 10, 2016, by the largest margin of victory in his region in more than 50 years and is currently serving his third term in Congress.

In January 2021, Mike was elected by his colleagues to serve as Vice Chairman of the House Republican Conference, one of the seven elected leadership positions for Republicans in the House of Representatives. In this leadership role, Mike helps guide his Republican colleagues to fight for core conservative principles and policies.  Mike also serves as an Assistant Whip for the 117th Congress, to help implement the Republican agenda. He was previously honored to serve as chairman of the Republican Study Committee, the largest caucus of conservatives in Congress, known as “the intellectual arsenal of conservatism in the House.”

With two decades of previous experience in Constitutional law, Mike serves on the House Judiciary Committee, and is the top-ranked Republican for its Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. He also serves on the House Armed Services Committee and is honored to represent Barksdale Air Force Base, headquarters of the Air Force Global Strike Command, and Fort Polk and the Army’s Joint Readiness Training Center, as well as the Louisiana National Guard’s Camp Minden Training Site and other military assets.

Mike is a dedicated husband and father of four and an attorney who has devoted his life and career to fighting for the fundamental freedoms and traditional values that have always been a priority to the people of Louisiana. Mike spent nearly 20 years successfully litigating high profile constitutional law cases in district and appellate courts nationwide and is widely recognized as a leading defender of the right to life, religious liberty, free speech, the Second Amendment and free market principles. In his law practice, he drafted landmark legislation for many states and municipalities and provided legal counsel to members of Congress, governors, state legislatures, city councils, school boards, law enforcement agencies, ministries and non-profit organizations around the country.

Mike solidified his reputation as a principled, full-spectrum conservative when he served in the Louisiana Legislature from February 2015 to January 2017. He was elected to the state legislature twice without opposition, and he was honored to be appointed Vice Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee and to the Select Committee on Leadership. As a legislator, both in the state capital and now in the nation’s capital, he has received top awards from business and industry, limited government, and pro-life and pro-family groups.

The eldest son of a Shreveport firefighter who was critically burned and disabled in the line of duty, Mike learned early on the values of hard work, honor and sacrifice. He has a practical understanding of the challenges that small business owners face because he, like his parents and grandparents, is one himself. Mike has also been a college professor, conservative talk radio host and columnist, a media spokesman for America’s largest religious liberty organizations, a constitutional law seminar instructor, and a board member for national organizations and numerous community groups and ministries.

Mike earned his Juris Doctorate from the Paul M. Hebert Law Center at Louisiana State University in 1998 where he was selected as a member of the Moot Court Board and National Moot Court Team and was elected class president and president of the Christian Legal Society. He earned his undergraduate degree in Business Administration from Louisiana State University in 1995, where he was selected to Leadership LSU and the Order of Omega Honor Society, Kappa Sigma Fraternity and served as president of the LSU Interfraternity Council.

Mike and his wife Kelly, a former school teacher from Webster Parish and now a Licensed Pastoral Counselor, have been married since 1999 and have four children, Hannah, Abigail, Jack and Will. Today, they reside in Bossier Parish.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Caucuses

  • Republican Study Committee
  • Congressional Sportsmen Caucus
  • Natural Gas Caucus
  • Western Caucus
  • Working Forests Caucus
  • Congressional Coalition on Adoption Caucus
  • Values Action Team
  • Historically Black Colleges and Universities Caucus
  • International Religious Freedom Caucus
  • Congressional Prayer Caucus
  • Congressional Caucus on Long-Range Strike
  • Congressional Second Amendment Caucus
  • House Army Caucus
  • House Air Force Caucus
  • Border Security Caucus
  • House Recording Arts and Sciences Congressional Caucus
  • Congressional Rice Caucus
  • Congressional Taiwan Caucus
  • National Guard Youth Challenge Caucus
  • Congressional Fire Services Caucus

Offices

Bossier City

2250 Hospital Drive
Suite 248
Bossier City, LA 71111
Phone: 318-840-0309

Northwestern State University

PO Box 4989 (mailing)
444 Caspari Drive
South Hall Room 224
Natchitoches, LA 71497
Office hours by appointment
Phone: 318-951-4316

Northwestern State University – Ft. Polk

3329 University Parkway
Building 552, Room 24
Leesville, LA 71446
Phone: 337-423-4232

Washington, DC

568 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: 202-225-2777

Contact

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Web

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Politics

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Wikipedia Entry

James Michael Johnson (born January 30, 1972) is an American attorney, politician, and former talk radio host serving as the U.S. representative for Louisiana’s 4th congressional district. First elected in 2016, he is also the vice chairman of the House Republican Conference. He previously served as chairman of the House Republican Study Committee, the largest caucus of conservatives in Congress, and a coalition of socially- and fiscally-conservative members of the larger House Republican Conference.[1]

From 2015 to 2017, Johnson served as a representative in the Louisiana House of Representatives for the 8th district in Bossier Parish.

Early life and education

Johnson was born in Shreveport,[2] the oldest of four children of Jeanne Johnson and the late James Patrick Johnson, a firefighter who founded the nonprofit organization, the Percy R. Johnson Burn Foundation, named after his partner Percy R. Johnson, the city’s first African-American Fire Instructor and Captain who died in the line of duty.[3] Johnson was also critically burned and disabled in the line of duty during the fire. Johnson has two brothers, Chris and Josh, and a sister, Laura.[4]

During Johnson’s high school time, he was a member of Louisiana Boys State. Johnson graduated from Captain Shreve High School in Shreveport. He received an undergraduate degree in business administration from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He holds a Juris Doctor from Louisiana State University Law Center,[5] and worked as constitutional attorney in Benton, in Bossier Parish seat of government located north of Bossier City, Louisiana.

Legal career

Prior to his election to Congress, Johnson was also a partner in the Kitchens Law Firm and a senior attorney and national media spokesman for the Alliance Defense Fund, now known as Alliance Defending Freedom, which describes itself as “a non-profit legal defense and advocacy organization dedicated to religious liberty, traditional family values, and the value and sanctity of life.”[6] Johnson was also formerly chief counsel of the non-profit law firm Freedom Guard.[7]

Johnson served as co-counsel for the state defendants in the lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the Louisiana state ban on same-sex marriage in both 2004 and again in 2015. He was driving home from a hearing on the matter before the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in New Orleans when he learned from a radio broadcast that he would run unopposed in his bid to succeed Thompson.[6]

Johnson served as a trustee of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission within the Southern Baptist Convention from 2004 to 2012.

Louisiana House of Representatives

Johnson ran unopposed in the special election called for February 21, 2015 to select a successor to Jeff R. Thompson, a Republican who had resigned to become a judge in Louisiana’s 26th Judicial District Court. The election was cancelled when only Johnson filed for the seat.[6] Johnson was re-elected on October 24, 2015, again running without opposition.[8]

Johnson was endorsed by United States Senator David Vitter and United States Representative John Fleming,[9] as well as the political action committee of the .

Louisiana Marriage and Conscience Act

In April 2015, Johnson proposed a bill titled the Marriage and Conscience Act, similar in content to Indiana‘s controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act passed a few days earlier, though Johnson denied that his legislation was based on the Indiana law.[10]

Johnson’s Marriage and Conscience Act would have eliminated the state of Louisiana’s ability to withhold a “state license, certification, accreditation, employment, state contracts, state benefits, or tax deductions” from a person or entity based on their views on the institution of marriage.[11] Critics denounced the bill as an attempt to protect people who discriminate against same-sex married couples.[12]

Then-Governor Bobby Jindal pledged to sign Johnson’s bill into law if it passed both houses of the legislature.[13] IBM and other employers in the region expressed their opposition to the bill, including concerns about the hiring difficulties it would likely produce.[14] Other politicians also objected, including fellow Republican, Baton Rouge Metro Councilman John Delgado, who described Johnson as a “despicable bigot of the highest order” for proposing the bill.[14]

On May 19, 2015, the House Civil Law and Procedure Committee voted 10–2 to table the bill, effectively ending its chances to become law.[15] Both Republicans and Democrats voted against the bill; other than Johnson, only Republican Ray Garofalo voted for it.[15] After the bill was tabled, Governor Jindal said that he would issue an executive order to enforce its intent.[16] Johnson planned to reintroduce his own bill in 2016.[citation needed]

Other

In March 2016, Johnson opposed a one-penny increase in the state sales tax proposed to help address Louisiana’s $940 million budget deficit. The one-penny increase was approved by a vote of 76 to 27, with one vacancy.[17] A House and Senate conference committee subsequently changed the duration of the tax from five years, as recommended by the state Senate to twenty-seven months, effective from April 1, 2016, to June 30, 2018.[citation needed]

In 2015 and 2016 Johnson led an anti-abortion “Life March” in Shreveport-Bossier City.[18]

Johnson opposed the Common Core State Standards Initiative.[19]

U.S House of Representatives

Elections

2016

On February 10, 2016, Johnson announced his candidacy for the 4th congressional district seat held for eight years by John Fleming, who was running, ultimately unsuccessfully, for the United States Senate seat vacated by David Vitter.

In a runoff election held on December 10, 2016, Johnson defeated Shreveport Democratic attorney Marshall Jones, 87,369 votes (65 percent) to 46,578 (35 percent). He won all fifteen parishes in the district, with 78 percent in Bossier Parish but only 52 percent in his native neighboring Caddo Parish, also the home of opponent Jones.[20] Eliminated in the November 8 primary election were Republicans Trey Baucum, a Shreveport cardiologist,[21] former State Senator Elbert Guillory of Opelousas, Shreveport attorney Rick John,[22]
Oliver Geoffrey Jenkins (born July 1966), a member of the Shreveport City Council.[23][24]

2018

In 2018, Johnson won his second term in the U.S. House, having led a three-candidate field with 139,307 votes (64 percent). Democrat Ryan Trundle trailed with 72,923 votes (34 percent).[25]

2020

In 2020, Johnson won his third term to the U.S. House, with 185,265 votes (60 percent) to Democratic opponent Kenny Houston’s 78,157 votes (25 percent).[26]

Tenure

Johnson was sworn into office on January 3, 2017. He is Vice Chairman of the Republican Conference, an Assistant Whip for House Republicans, a member of the Judiciary Committee, the Armed Services Committee, and a member and former Chairman of the Republican Study Committee.[27]

Johnson voted in favor of the American Health Care Act of 2017.[28]

In December 2017, Johnson voted in favor of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.[29] After voting for the act, Johnson described the economy as “stunted” and as a “burden” on Americans. Additionally, “The importance of this moment cannot be overstated. With the first comprehensive tax reform in 31 years, we will dramatically strengthen the U.S. economy and restore economic mobility and opportunity for hardworking individuals and families all across this country.”[30]

On May 19, 2021, Johnson and all the other seven Republican House leaders in the 117th Congress voted against establishing a National Commission to Investigate the January 6, 2021 storming of the United States Capitol. Thirty-five Republican House members and all 217 Democrats present voted to establish such a commission.[31][32]

Committee assignments

Caucus Membership

Political positions

Johnson receiving the True Blue award from FRC President Tony Perkins in 2018

Immigration

Johnson supported President Donald Trump‘s 2017 executive order to prohibit immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries, stating “This is not an effort to ban any religion, but rather an effort to adequately protect our homeland. We live in a dangerous world, and this important measure will help us balance freedom and security.”[35]

Abortion

Johnson opposes abortion and supports legislation to prohibit abortions after week 20 of a pregnancy.[36]

Cannabis

Johnson believes medical marijuana is a “gateway drug” for other drugs.[37]

Donald Trump

In 2019, Johnson claimed, “President Trump cooperated fully with the [Special Counsel Mueller] investigation.”[38]

Johnson served as a member of President Trump’s legal defense team during both the 2019 and 2020 Senate impeachment trials, which ultimately resulted in acquittals by the U.S. Senate.[39]

In December 2020, Johnson was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives who signed an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden prevailed[40] over incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of the election held by another state.[41][42][43]

LGBT rights

Johnson opposed the results of Obergefell vs. Hodges, which legalized same-sex marriage across the US. He believes the decision should be state by state, not made by the Supreme Court.[44]

School prayer

In April 2018, Johnson joined Republican state Attorney General Jeff Landry and Christian actor Kirk Cameron to argue under the First Amendment for student-led prayer and religious expression in public schools. Johnson and Landry appeared, with Cameron who spoke on a promotional video, at prayer rallies at the First Baptist Church of Minden and in Bossier City. The gatherings were organized by area pastors, including Brad Jurkovich of First Baptist Bossier, in response to a lawsuit filed in February against the Bossier Parish School Board and the superintendent, Scott Smith. The board and the superintendent are accused of permitting teachers to incorporate various aspects of Christianity in their class presentations.[45]

Personal life

Johnson is married to the former Kelly Lary (born October 1973). Kelly Johnson is a Licensed Pastoral Counselor, a lecturer on family-related issues, and a former school teacher. They have two sons and two daughters. Johnson has formerly resided in Shreveport, Baton Rouge, and in Allen in Collin County, Texas.[46]

References

  1. ^ Hilburn, Greg (November 16, 2018). “Mike Johnson wins post on GOP launching pad”. . Retrieved November 18, 2018.
  2. ^ “J. Michael Johnson – Lawyer in Bossier City, Louisiana (LA) Bossier County – legaldirectories.com”. legaldirectories.com.
  3. ^ “About Percy R. Johnson”.
  4. ^ “James Patrick Johnson”. The Shreveport Times. Retrieved December 13, 2016.
  5. ^ “About Mike”. mikejohnsonlouisiana.com. Retrieved March 30, 2015.
  6. ^ a b c Cook, Nancy (January 10, 2015). “Conservative Republican walks into Louisiana Legislature’s District 8 seat unopposed”. KTAL-TV (NBC): arklatexhomepage.com. Retrieved March 30, 2015.
  7. ^ Burris, Alexandria (January 16, 2015). “Looming session leaves little wiggle room for Johnson”. The Shreveport Times. Retrieved March 30, 2015.
  8. ^ “A look at the La. lawmakers re-elected without opposition”. The Washington Times. Associated Press. September 11, 2015.
  9. ^ “Mike Johnson announces bid for Louisiana House seat: Candidacy endorsed by U.S. Senator Vitter, Congressman John Fleming, others”. mikejohnsonlouisiana.com. August 29, 2014. Retrieved March 30, 2015.
  10. ^ Lau, Maya (April 1, 2015). “Bossier legislator mulls religious freedom bill”. The Shreveport Times in . Retrieved April 2, 2015.
  11. ^ “Rep. Mike Johnson Calls His Marriage and Conscience Act A Call For “Freedom and Tolerance”. KEEL (AM). Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  12. ^ Epps, Garrett. “What Will Bobby Jindal’s ‘Marriage and Conscience Order’ Actually Do?”. The Atlantic. Retrieved 2017-02-19.
  13. ^ “Bobby Jindal gives his take on gay marriage in New York Times editorial”. The New York Times. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  14. ^ a b “Louisiana religious freedom bill author a ‘despicable bigot,’ Baton Rouge council member says”. NOLA.com. Retrieved 2017-02-22.
  15. ^ a b Lane, Emily (May 19, 2015). “Louisiana’s religious freedom bill effectively defeated in committee”. New Orleans Times-Picayune. Retrieved May 19, 2015.
  16. ^ Lane, Emily (May 19, 2015). “Bobby Jindal plans to issue an executive order enforcing intent of religious freedom bill”. New Orleans Times-Picayune. Retrieved May 19, 2015.
  17. ^ “State House of Representatives Vote to Increase Sales Tax”. KEEL. February 25, 2016. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  18. ^ Hilburn, Greg (January 6, 2016). “4th District field inches toward gate”. The Shreveport Times. Retrieved January 7, 2016.
  19. ^ “Mike Johnson Grabs LABI’s NORTHPAC Endorsement”. thehayride.com. 18 December 2014. Retrieved March 30, 2015.
  20. ^ “Election Returns”. Louisiana Secretary of State. December 10, 2016. Retrieved December 13, 2016.
  21. ^ “State Rep. Johnson to run for 4th Congressional seat”. KALB-TV. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  22. ^ Hilburn, Greg (February 22, 2016). “Shreveport attorney enters 4th District race”. The Shreveport Times. Retrieved August 16, 2016.
  23. ^ KEEL Radio, February 10, 2016
  24. ^ “Election Returns”. Louisiana Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved December 13, 2016.
  25. ^ “Election Returns”. Louisiana Secretary of State. November 6, 2018. Retrieved November 8, 2018.
  26. ^ “Mike Johnson (Louisiana)”.
  27. ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  28. ^ “FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 256”.
  29. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (19 December 2017). “How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  30. ^ “Johnson on tax reform: ‘Republicans have fulfilled our promise’ – Bossier Press-Tribune”. bossierpress.com. Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  31. ^ Roll Call 154 Bill Number: H. R. 3233 117th Congress, 1st Session, United States House of Representatives, May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  32. ^ How Republicans voted on a commission to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, Washington Post, May 19, 2021. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  33. ^ Desiderio, Andrew (2018-11-28). “Meet the Double Agent Who Now Controls House Conservatives”. The Daily Beast. Retrieved 2021-04-25.
  34. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. 2017-12-06. Retrieved 2021-03-28.
  35. ^ Blake, Aaron (29 January 2017). “Coffman, Gardner join Republicans against President Trump’s travel ban; here’s where the rest stand”. Denver Post. Retrieved 30 January 2017.
  36. ^ “La. Representatives give their take on abortion”. KALB. Associated Press. Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  37. ^ “Medical marijuana bill gets approval from the House”. Louisiana Radio Network. Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  38. ^ Crisp, Elizabeth (July 24, 2019). “Louisiana U.S. Reps. Cedric Richmond, Mike Johnson question special counsel Robert Mueller”. NOLA. Retrieved Dec 19, 2019.
  39. ^ Second impeachment trial of Donald Trump
  40. ^ Blood, Michael R.; Riccardi, Nicholas (December 5, 2020). “Biden officially secures enough electors to become president”. AP News. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  41. ^ Liptak, Adam (2020-12-11). “Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved 2020-12-12.
  42. ^ “Order in Pending Case” (PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. 2020-12-11. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  43. ^ Diaz, Daniella. “Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  44. ^ Dickerson, Seth. “Mike Johnson: Wants to ‘make government work again’. shreveporttimes.com. Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  45. ^ Wooten, Nick (April 6, 2018). “Actor Kirk Cameron makes promo video for Bossier, Webster prayer rallies”. The Shreveport Times. Retrieved April 14, 2018.
  46. ^ “James M. Johnson in Benton, Louisiana”. intelius.com. Retrieved March 30, 2015.

External links

Louisiana House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the Louisiana House of Representatives
from the 8th district

2015–2017
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. Representative
for Louisiana’s 4th congressional district

2017–present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by

Chair of the Republican Study Committee
2019–2021
Succeeded by

Vice Chair of the House Republican Conference
2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
265th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

Legislation

Learn more about legislation sponsored and co-sponsored by Congressman Johnson.

Issues

 

X
Julia LetlowJulia Letlow – LA5

Current Position: US Senator for LA District 5 since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Academic administrator from 2011 – 2021

Featured Quote: 
America’s Greatest Generation paved the way for our freedom. Today, we #RemembertheFallen and honor those who gave so much. #DDay

Featured Video: 
Julia Letlow, new congresswoman whose husband died from COVID, encourages Americans to get vaccin…

WASHINGTON, D.C.– Congresswoman Julia Letlow (LA-05) today was joined by Minority Whip Steve Scalise (LA-01), Congressman Garret Graves (LA-06), Congressman Clay Higgins (LA-03), and Congressman Troy Carter (LA-02) in sending a letter to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, asking them to speed up the completion of Operation Blue Roof. In the wake of Hurricane Ida, more than 62,000 Louisiana households have applied for assistance under the program, but only 3,743 installations have been completed to date.

The bipartisan group noted that while the Corps is dedicating additional resources to the program, even the advanced completion rate will not meet the pressing need in Southeast Louisiana. “While we appreciate the accelerated speed under this ramp up, at that rate it would take approximately 98 days to complete installation for every applicant under the Blue Roof program,” the letter states. “This timeframe is unacceptable and will lead to additional damage to homes while people’s roofs remain exposed to the elements.”

The letter also included a request for the Corps to provide regular updates on the status of the program to Louisiana’s Congressional Delegation, including regular reports of the number of households served on a parish-by-parish basis.

To read a copy of the full letter, click HERE.

Summary

Current Position: US Senator for LA District 5 since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Academic administrator from 2011 – 2021

Featured Quote: 
America’s Greatest Generation paved the way for our freedom. Today, we #RemembertheFallen and honor those who gave so much. #DDay

Featured Video: 
Julia Letlow, new congresswoman whose husband died from COVID, encourages Americans to get vaccin…

News

WASHINGTON, D.C.– Congresswoman Julia Letlow (LA-05) today was joined by Minority Whip Steve Scalise (LA-01), Congressman Garret Graves (LA-06), Congressman Clay Higgins (LA-03), and Congressman Troy Carter (LA-02) in sending a letter to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, asking them to speed up the completion of Operation Blue Roof. In the wake of Hurricane Ida, more than 62,000 Louisiana households have applied for assistance under the program, but only 3,743 installations have been completed to date.

The bipartisan group noted that while the Corps is dedicating additional resources to the program, even the advanced completion rate will not meet the pressing need in Southeast Louisiana. “While we appreciate the accelerated speed under this ramp up, at that rate it would take approximately 98 days to complete installation for every applicant under the Blue Roof program,” the letter states. “This timeframe is unacceptable and will lead to additional damage to homes while people’s roofs remain exposed to the elements.”

The letter also included a request for the Corps to provide regular updates on the status of the program to Louisiana’s Congressional Delegation, including regular reports of the number of households served on a parish-by-parish basis.

To read a copy of the full letter, click HERE.

Twitter

About

Source: Government page

Congresswoman Julia Letlow represents Louisiana’s 5th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives and is the state’s first Republican woman elected to Congress.

Julia took office in April 2021 after receiving 65 percent of the vote in a special election to win the seat previously won by her husband Luke, who passed away from complications of COVID-19 just days before taking office. She is the first woman to represent Louisiana in the House of Representatives in 30 years.

Julia serves on the House Committee on Agriculture and the House Committee on Education and Labor.

A native of Monroe, Julia is a mother and professional in education who has dedicated her life to promote and advocate for higher education in Louisiana.

Julia graduated from the University of Louisiana Monroe (ULM), with a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in speech communication. After completing her doctorate in communication from the University of South Florida, she returned to ULM as the ombudsperson and special projects coordinator for the Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs, where she contributed to the development of the university’s strategic plan.

Julia served as the executive director of external affairs and strategic communications at ULM from 2018 to 2019 and prior served as the director of marketing and communications for the university. She previously served at the Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans as the director of education, director of resident patient safety and quality improvement, and a clinical instructor of anesthesiology. She has also served as an instructor and teaching associate at ULM, Tulane University, and the University of South Florida.

Julia is raising her two young children in Start, Louisiana, and they worship at Covenant Presbyterian Church (EPC) in Monroe.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Offices

1408 Longworth House Office Building

Washington, DC  20515

Phone: (202) 225-8490
4124 Jackson Street

Alexandria, LA  71301

Phone: (318) 319-6465
1900 North 18th Street, Suite 501

Monroe, LA  71201

Phone: (318) 570-6440
109 E. Oak Street

Amite, LA  70422

Phone: (985) 284-5200

Contact

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Wikipedia Entry

Julia Janelle Letlow (née Barnhill; born March 16, 1981) is an American politician and academic administrator serving as the U.S. representative for Louisiana’s 5th congressional district since 2021.[4] Letlow is the first Republican woman to represent Louisiana in Congress.[5]

Early life and education

Letlow was born Julia Janelle Barnhill on March 16, 1981, in Monroe, Louisiana. She graduated from Ouachita Christian High School.[6] She earned her Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in speech communications from the University of Louisiana at Monroe, followed by a Doctor of Philosophy in communications from the University of South Florida in 2012. Her doctoral advisor was Jane Jorgenson. Barnhill’s dissertation in 2011 was titled Giving Meaning to Grief: the Role of Rituals and Stories in Coping with Sudden Family Loss.[7] She dedicated it to her brother, Jeremy, who died in an automobile collision.[8]

Early career

She worked as director of education and patient safety for Tulane University School of Medicine.[9] In 2018, she was named director of external affairs and strategic communications for the University of Louisiana at Monroe (ULM).[10] In 2020, she was a finalist for the presidency of ULM.[11]

U.S. House of Representatives

Election

Letlow’s husband, Luke Letlow, was elected to the United States House of Representatives for Louisiana’s 5th congressional district in the 2020 elections, but died of complications from COVID-19 infection in December 2020, prior to taking office.[12] Julia decided to run in the special election for the vacant seat in January 2021.[13] During her campaign, Letlow secured a number of high-profile endorsements, including one from former President Donald Trump.[14] By the end of February, Letlow had raised $683,000, the highest amount of money raised by any candidate in the race.[15] On March 20, Letlow received over 64% of the vote in the nonpartisan blanket primary, winning the election outright and avoiding the potential run-off.[16][17] She was sworn in on April 14.[8]

Committee assignments

Political positions

Immigration

Letlow released a statement criticizing the Biden administration for “immigration detainees being released” in the state of Louisiana, writing that “I join my fellow members of the Louisiana delegation in demanding a thorough and complete explanation of this situation and urge the Administration to stop these releases immediately”.[19]

Infrastructure

In July 2021, Letlow told KNOE-TV that there’s “Nothing like a pandemic to bring to light how vital rural broadband is to our district”, and said that rural broadband can provide better access to quality healthcare and education. KNOE wrote that Letlow still did not commit to supporting the infrastructure plan proposed by Joe Biden, with Letlow arguing that “You know, it’s the political football… I really want to make sure that that infrastructure bill addresses true infrastructure needs. Roads, bridges, ports, rural broadband. Cut the other part out.”[20]

2020 presidential election

Letlow said she would have joined the majority of Republican representatives in objecting the results of the 2020 presidential election in Congress, had she been in office at the time.[15]

Personal life

She met Luke Letlow in high school and they married in 2013.[21][9] She has two children with her late husband.[22] Letlow addressed vaccine hesitancy among Republicans and encouraged them to get the COVID-19 vaccine, invoking her husband’s death from the virus.[23]

Electoral history

2021 Louisiana’s 5th congressional district special election[16]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Julia Letlow 67,203 64.86
DemocraticSandra “Candy” Christophe28,25527.27
RepublicanChad Conerly5,4975.31
RepublicanRobert Lansden9290.90
RepublicanAllen Guillory4640.45
IndependentJim Davis4020.39
RepublicanSancha Smith3340.32
RepublicanM.V. “Vinny” Mendoza2360.23
IndependentJaycee Magnuson1310.13
RepublicanRichard H. Pannell670.06
RepublicanHorace Melton III620.06
RepublicanErrol Victor Sr.360.03
Total votes103,616 100.00
Republican hold

Notes

  1. ^ Letlow’s husband Luke Letlow was elected to succeed retiring Representative Ralph Abraham, but died on December 29, 2020, of COVID-19, before taking office.[2] A special election was held on March 20, 2021 and was won by Letlow.[3]

References

  1. ^ “Terms of Service for Members of the House of Representatives in the 117th Congress” (PDF). Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  2. ^ Deslatte, Melinda (December 30, 2020). “Louisiana Congressman-elect Luke Letlow dies from COVID-19”. Associated Press. Retrieved January 2, 2021.
  3. ^ Seitz-Wald, Alex (March 20, 2021). “Republican Julia Letlow wins special congressional election in Louisiana, NBC News projects”. NBC News. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  4. ^ Seitz-Wald, Alex (March 20, 2021). “Republican Julia Letlow wins special congressional election in Louisiana, NBC News projects”. NBC News. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  5. ^ Adam Levy and Ethan Cohen. “Julia Letlow makes history in Louisiana’s 5th District special election while 2nd District goes to runoff”. CNN. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  6. ^ Bridges, Tyler (March 15, 2021). “Julia Letlow, picking up torch from her late husband, is favored to win congressional race”. The Advocate. Georges Media. Retrieved March 19, 2021.
  7. ^ Barnhill, Julia Janelle (2011). Giving Meaning to Grief: the Role of Rituals and Stories in Coping with Sudden Family Loss (Ph.D. thesis). University of South Florida. OCLC 778367257.
  8. ^ a b Fram, Alan (April 14, 2021). “Louisiana congresswoman Julia Letlow takes office, replacing late husband”. The Advocate. Associated Press. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  9. ^ a b “Barnhill – Letlow”. . Monroe, Louisiana. March 24, 2013. p. 44. Retrieved March 21, 2021 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  10. ^ “Letlow named director of external affairs and strategic communications at ULM”. The News-Star. Retrieved January 15, 2021.
  11. ^ “Seven candidates in the running for ULM president”. The News-Star. Retrieved January 15, 2021.
  12. ^ “Luke Letlow’s family talks about the congressman-elect’s COVID death”. The News-Star. Retrieved January 15, 2021.
  13. ^ “Julia Letlow, widow of U.S. Rep-elect Luke Letlow, to run for Congress”. The News-Star. December 30, 2020. Retrieved January 15, 2021.
  14. ^ Axelrod, Tal (March 20, 2021). “Trump boosts Julia Letlow ahead of Louisiana special election”. The Hill. Retrieved March 31, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  15. ^ a b Pathe, Simone (March 19, 2021). “Running to replace husband who died from Covid-19, Julia Letlow hopes to bring her own experience to Congress”. CNN. Retrieved March 19, 2021.
  16. ^ a b “U. S. Representative – 5th Congressional District”. Louisiana Secretary of State. March 20, 2021.
  17. ^ “Louisiana Primary Election Results 2021”. New York Times. March 20, 2021.
  18. ^ Johnson, My Sherie (May 11, 2022). “Louisiana Congresswoman Julia Letlow fills seat on United States House Committee on Appropriations”. WGNO. Retrieved May 12, 2022.
  19. ^ Thompkins, Jarmarlon. “Congresswoman Julia Letlow gives statement on ICE releases”. KNOE-TV. Retrieved August 3, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  20. ^ Englander, Tyler (July 7, 2021). “Rep. Letlow talks rural broadband needs, infrastructure bill, COVID vaccine”. KNOE-TV. Retrieved August 3, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  21. ^ “Family obituary for Louisiana Congressman-elect Luke Letlow, who died from COVID complications”. The News-Star. Retrieved January 29, 2021.
  22. ^ Sentell, Will. “Luke Letlow’s widow, Julia, files for his U.S. House seat after his death from coronavirus”. The Advocate. Retrieved January 29, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  23. ^ Main, Alison; Kelly, Caroline (March 28, 2021). ‘Look at my family. Use my story’: Rep.-elect Julia Letlow urges Republicans to get Covid vaccine after husband’s death”. CNN. Retrieved March 29, 2021.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Louisiana’s 5th congressional district

2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
423rd
Succeeded by